Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to read wav files off the SD card for a audio sampler app I'm building using the NDK and 100% native code. I have a method which iterates through a predefined array containing the sample paths and streams each individually into a data buffer to be later played by OpenSL.

When I loaded the files as assets, using the following method:

int open_asset(AAssetManager* mgr, char* filename, int samp)
{

    assert(NULL != mgr);
    AAsset *asset = AAssetManager_open(mgr, filename, AASSET_MODE_BUFFER);

    __android_log_write(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "ASSET", "AAssetManager_open");

    if (NULL == asset)
    {
        __android_log_write(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "ASSET", "Asset not found, loading aborted.");
        return JNI_FALSE;
    }

    oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header = (unsigned short*) malloc(HEADER_SIZE);
    AAsset_read(asset, oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header, HEADER_SIZE);

    unsigned short* fmttype;
    unsigned long* databytes;

    fmttype = (oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header + 10);

    if (*fmttype != 0x1)
    {
        __android_log_write(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "ASSET", "*fmttype not PCM, loading aborted.");
        return JNI_FALSE;
    }

    databytes = (oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header + 20);

    oneshot_samples[samp].data_size = *databytes;

    oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_data = (unsigned short*) malloc(*databytes);
    AAsset_seek(asset, HEADER_SIZE, SEEK_SET);
    AAsset_read(asset, oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_data, oneshot_samples[samp].data_size);

    __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "ASSET", "*fmttype: %x", *fmttype);
    __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "ASSET", "*databytes: %x", *databytes);

    AAsset_close(asset);

    __android_log_write(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "ASSET", "AAsset_close(asset)");

    return JNI_TRUE;
}

They load without a problem. But for my app, I want the user to be able to read samples from the SD Card too. I changed the file paths to a hard coded location on the SD Card (just for testing), and tried the following method using fopen() and fread():

void open_external_file(char* filepath, int samp)
{

    FILE* fp;
    oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header = (unsigned short*) malloc(HEADER_SIZE);

    __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "open_external_file",
                        "filepath: %s", filepath);

    __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "open_external_file",
                        "size of filepath: %d", sizeof filepath);

    if ((fp = fopen(filepath, "r")) != NULL)
    {
        __android_log_write(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "open_external_file", "fopen()");

        fread(oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header, sizeof(unsigned short), HEADER_SIZE, fp);
    }

    unsigned short* fmttype;
    unsigned long* databytes;

    fmttype = (oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header + 10);

    if (*fmttype != 0x1)
    {
        __android_log_write(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "open_external_file", "*fmttype not PCM, loading aborted.");
    }

    databytes = (oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header + 20);
    oneshot_samples[samp].data_size = *databytes;
    oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_data = (unsigned short*) malloc(*databytes);

    __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "open_external_file", "*fmttype: %x", *fmttype);
    __android_log_print(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "open_external_file", "*databytes: %x", *databytes);


    fseek(fp , HEADER_SIZE , SEEK_SET);
    fread(oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_data, sizeof(unsigned short), oneshot_samples[samp].data_size, fp);

    fclose(fp);
    __android_log_write(ANDROID_LOG_DEBUG, "open_external_file", "fclose(fp);");
}

Which gives me the dreaded ANR and inevitable crash:

06-06 11:42:30.915: I/dalvikvm(7222): threadid=3: reacting to signal 3 06-06 11:42:30.915: A/libc(7222): Fatal signal 11 (SIGSEGV) at 0x0000000c (code=1)

But the weird thing is that it happens seemingly quite randomly - there are 36 odd samples, and sometimes the error appears after just the 4th, and sometimes after 20 or so. After reading this thread, it appears it could be a segmentation fault, but I'm at a loss as to how it could be caused - or what the difference between the two methods is.

The values from the file header *fmttype and *databytes are returned 100% correctly every time.

I'm very new to C so it's quite possible I'm doing something obviously wrong - would really appreciate if someone more experienced could shed some light onto what the cause may be.

Update: I switched back using AAsset_read(), and am still getting:

06-06 12:33:50.393: I/dalvikvm(9755): threadid=3: reacting to signal 3 06-06 12:33:50.393: I/dalvikvm(9755): Wrote stack traces to '/data/anr/traces.txt'

But the files still load fine every time, and the app does not crash. The total size of my test samples is 48.4 MB for a 512 MB test tablet - could this be causing the issue? Still, if it was I don't see how using AAsset_read() would make a difference.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're allocating HEADER_SIZE bytes:

(unsigned short*) malloc(HEADER_SIZE);

and then reading HEADER_SIZE * 2 bytes into it, overflowing the buffer:

fread(oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_header, sizeof(unsigned short), HEADER_SIZE, fp);

(fread() multiplies sizeof(unsigned short) by HEADER_SIZE, doubling it.)

You do the same over-read again for databytes. It doesn't fail for the android asset implementation because you're reading the correct amount of data in. Fix it by changing sizeof(unsigned short) to 1.

Unrelated: if fopen() returns NULL, you should probably return from the function, rather than processing uninitialized data.

The "signal 3" message just means the system is requesting a stack trace from the app, possibly because the main thread was busy and didn't respond to a message.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer. What I want to know is: buffer_data is an unsigned short*, each sample must 16 bits, i.e, OpenSL ES needs to read it that way. Would changing sizeof(unsigned short) to 1 affect the way the data gets arranged in the buffer? The data in the wave file is also arranged as little endian. –  Michael Petrie Jun 6 '13 at 2:56
    
It won't change how the data is placed in the buffer. Why fread() was declared this way is something of a mystery. Other people have wondered about it... stackoverflow.com/questions/295994/… –  fadden Jun 6 '13 at 4:54
    
Interesting read. As you say, fread(oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_data, sizeof(unsigned short), oneshot_samples[samp].data_size/2, fp) and fread(oneshot_samples[samp].buffer_data, 1, oneshot_samples[samp].data_size, fp) gave me the exact same result. It's obvious why AAsset_read() was working and fread() not. Thanks for solving my problem. –  Michael Petrie Jun 6 '13 at 5:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.