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I need to dynamically generate python code and execute it with eval() function.

What I would like to do is to generate some "imports" and "assign values". I mean, I need to generate this string to evaluate it eval(x).

x = """
import testContextSummary
import util.testGroupUtils
testDb = [testContextSummary.TestContextSummary, 
          testGroupUtils.testGroupUtils.TestGroupUtils]
""" # x is automatically generated
eval(x)
... use testDb ...

I tried with this code, but eval() returns an error not recognizing import, so I tried this code.

x = """
testContextSummary = __import__("testContextSummary")
testGroupUtils = __import__("util.testGroupUtils")
testDb = [testContextSummary.TestContextSummary, 
          testGroupUtils.testGroupUtils.TestGroupUtils]
""" # x is automatically generated

eval(x) # error

I again got an error not allowing assignment statement.

Is there any way to execute dynamically generated python script, and use the result from the evalution?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You want exec instead of eval.

>>> s = "x = 2"
>>> exec s
>>> x
2

Of course, please don't use exec on untrusted strings ...

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prosseek: It's because exec() can handle multiple lines of Python, whereas eval() only evaluates a single expression. Be safe. –  martineau Jun 6 '13 at 0:40
    
@martineau: I didn't see the original comment, but the same caveats with exec apply equally to eval and it has nothing to do with multiple lines of code ... (__import__('os').remove('important_file')) –  mgilson Jun 6 '13 at 1:02

This may also work:

x = """[
        __import__("testContextSummary").TestContextSummary, 
        __import__("util.testGroupUtils").testGroupUtils.TestGroupUtils]
"""
testDB=eval(x)
share|improve this answer
    
While that might work in this particular case, things could get tricky if there were multiple names defined or there was more complicated logic in the dynamically generated code, like if/else constructs and/or function/class definitions, etc -- all of which exec() ought to be able to handle. –  martineau Jun 6 '13 at 7:44

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