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I have a problem when I run try to free anything within this struct. First the struct definition in the header:

    typedef struct{
int* rType;
unsigned long int numCols;
char* rString;  //The literal string, NULL delimited
int rsSize;     //The size of the string, since NULLS can't be used to find the string end
int* colsIndex; //Where each new column starts in rString
long* iColVals;   //integer version of the column
double* dColVals; //double precision value of column
}  row_t ;

Then here is where an instance of the struct can be created:

row_t* delimitLine(char* line, char* delimList, char delimListSize)
{
row_t* thisRow;
.
.
.
//Make a place for this stuff in memory
thisRow = (row_t*) malloc(sizeof(row_t));
if(thisRow==NULL) return NULL;
.
.
.
thisRow->rString = line;

//Make Row Mem

    //colsIndex
    thisRow->colsIndex = (int*) malloc(numCols*sizeof(int));
    if(thisRow->colsIndex==NULL) return NULL;   

    //rType
    thisRow->rType = (int*) malloc(numCols*sizeof(int));
    if(thisRow->rType==NULL) return NULL;   

    //iColVals
    thisRow->iColVals = (long*) malloc(numCols*sizeof(long));
    if(thisRow->iColVals==NULL) return NULL;    

    //dColVals
    thisRow->dColVals = (double*) malloc(numCols*sizeof(double));   
    if(thisRow->dColVals==NULL) return NULL;    
.
.
.
return thisRow;

Then here is how "line" is created:

char* RBreadLine(fifo_t* fifo)
{
char* outbuf = NULL;
.
.
.
outbuf = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char)*(cnt+1));
.
.
.
return outbuf;
}

Finally the calling sequence:

main()
{
row_t* row = NULL;
.
.
.
while(kg>=0)
{
//test condition to exit loop not shown
line = RBreadLine(fifo);
.
.
.

 row = delimitLine(line, delimList, delimListSize);
//some code to manipulate the row data here
 printRow(row);
 rowDestructor(row);



}

}

The program operates as expected when I comment out the call to rowDestructor, but crashes if I try to free anything. I have tried commenting all lines except for an individual member of struct and still get crashes, so I am doing something wrong here.

The idea is to have a large text file processing program that reads line-by-line and lets me do stuff to manipulate the row data, then printRow() outputs the final result.

The simple test case was to just output the values as they come out of the delimitLine function (which just allocates memory and populates the row struct with data).

When this process has finished, I should want to free the memory and start over. This program works as expected if I do not make a call to the destructor, but instead simply orphan these pointers each time there is a new call to RBreadLine() and delimitLine().

If I make a call to rowDestructor(), then the program crashes after the first line (on the first call to rowDestructor() ):

 Now to start outputting line
    1)  2)  3)  4)  5)  6)  7)  8)  9)  10)  (-10)63.116722551236001948     0       0       0       0       1       1       1       1       1       0    1

    Aborted (core dumped)

Perhaps there is something I don't understand about malloc() or free(), but it seems if I can access valid data from the struct members without errors and without causing a crash, then free should be able to free the mem that has been malloc'd.

Perhaps I am just doing something bad by passing these pointers all around (like passing the pointer to "line" to a function which assigns it to a struct member) but in my mind it's all well accounted. I know every member of the struct gets malloc'd, and so I should be able to just free it all as I work my way up then free the struct. Then I can dump another pointer onto the row struct and go at it again.

The reason I am doing this is because I want to be able to process extremely large data sets. This is a structural rewrite of a program that used to load it all into memory with an fread, then process it, but some of my data sets cause the computer to run out of memory...so I will resort to a block processing approach.

Once I can successfully free a row, then I can build on this by making a row_t**, where I can cycle rows onto the row_t** using a FIFO buffer concept, which will then allow me to seek the text files forward and backward by a reasonable amount (say for application of FIR filters) but won't require having the whole file loaded to memory.

For example, a row FIFO would store these new row_t* structs onto a row_t** and I free the old ones after I fill the circular buffer and begin to overwrite the old pointers...this is where I am going with this.

I think having an answer to this question will be a breakthrough in my understanding of malloc() and free(), or maybe clear something up regarding pointers and structs.

Thanks for any input.

EDIT: I apologize for overlooking the most important part of my question:

void rowDestructor(row_t* thisRow)
{
    //rString
    free(thisRow->rString);

    //colsIndex
    free(thisRow->colsIndex);   

    //rType
    free(thisRow->rType);   

    //iColVals
    free(thisRow->iColVals);    

    //dColVals
    free(thisRow->dColVals);

    //finally kill the whole thing
    free(thisRow);
}

And, since others mentioned compiler flags, here is what I am using:

gcc  -Wall laproc.c utils.c csvsurgeon.c -lm -o csv-surgeon

(laproc.c is my specific signal processing code needing to be linked with math lib, and in this example I have simplified it to where these functions are not called to rule them out)

I am using this version of gcc:

$ gcc -v
Using built-in specs.
COLLECT_GCC=gcc
COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=/usr/lib/gcc/i686-pc-cygwin/4.5.3/lto-wrapper.exe
Target: i686-pc-cygwin
Configured with: /gnu/gcc/releases/respins/4.5.3-3/gcc4-4.5.3-3/src/gcc-4.5.3/configure --srcdir=/gnu/gcc/releases/respins/4.5.3-3/gcc4-4.5.3-3/src/gc
c-4.5.3 --prefix=/usr --exec-prefix=/usr --bindir=/usr/bin --sbindir=/usr/sbin --libexecdir=/usr/lib --datadir=/usr/share --localstatedir=/var --sysco
nfdir=/etc --datarootdir=/usr/share --docdir=/usr/share/doc/gcc4 -C --datadir=/usr/share --infodir=/usr/share/info --mandir=/usr/share/man -v --with-g
mp=/usr --with-mpfr=/usr --enable-bootstrap --enable-version-specific-runtime-libs --libexecdir=/usr/lib --enable-static --enable-shared --enable-shar
ed-libgcc --disable-__cxa_atexit --with-gnu-ld --with-gnu-as --with-dwarf2 --disable-sjlj-exceptions --enable-languages=ada,c,c++,fortran,java,lto,obj
c,obj-c++ --enable-graphite --enable-lto --enable-java-awt=gtk --disable-symvers --enable-libjava --program-suffix=-4 --enable-libgomp --enable-libssp
 --enable-libada --enable-threads=posix --with-arch=i686 --with-tune=generic --enable-libgcj-sublibs CC=gcc-4 CXX=g++-4 CC_FOR_TARGET=gcc-4 CXX_FOR_TA
RGET=g++-4 GNATMAKE_FOR_TARGET=gnatmake GNATBIND_FOR_TARGET=gnatbind --with-ecj-jar=/usr/share/java/ecj.jar
Thread model: posix
gcc version 4.5.3 (GCC)

Perhaps that is my problem... I have recompiled with the other following gcc versions:

Using built-in specs.
COLLECT_GCC=C:\Program Files\CodeBlocks\MinGW-newer\bin\gcc.exe
COLLECT_LTO_WRAPPER=c:/program files/codeblocks/mingw-newer/bin/../libexec/gcc/mingw32/4.5.2/lto-wrapper.exe
Target: mingw32
Configured with: ../../src/gcc-4.5.2/configure --build=mingw32 --enable-languages=c,c++,ada,fortran,objc,obj-c++ --enable-threads=win32 --enable-libgo
mp --enable-lto --enable-fully-dynamic-string --enable-libstdcxx-debug --enable-version-specific-runtime-libs --with-gnu-ld --disable-nls --disable-wi
n32-registry --disable-symvers --disable-werror --prefix=/mingw32tdm --with-local-prefix=/mingw32tdm --enable-cxx-flags='-fno-function-sections -fno-d
ata-sections' --with-pkgversion=tdm-1 --enable-sjlj-exceptions --with-bugurl=http://tdm-gcc.tdragon.net/bugs
Thread model: win32
gcc version 4.5.2 (tdm-1)

And another version

Using built-in specs.
Target: mingw32
Configured with: ../../gcc-4.4.1/configure --prefix=/mingw --build=mingw32 --enable-languages=c,ada,c++,fortran,objc,obj-c++ --disable-nls --disable-w
in32-registry --enable-libgomp --enable-cxx-flags='-fno-function-sections -fno-data-sections' --disable-werror --enable-threads --disable-symvers --en
able-version-specific-runtime-libs --enable-fully-dynamic-string --with-pkgversion='TDM-2 mingw32' --enable-sjlj-exceptions --with-bugurl=http://www.t
dragon.net/recentgcc/bugs.php
Thread model: win32
gcc version 4.4.1 (TDM-2 mingw32)

With the 4.4.1 version, it will seg fault at different points in the run. On a couple runs it even made it through once without seg faulting, so perhaps I have a compiler problem. Because I have cygwin, perhaps the compilers are inter-mixing utilities and linkers (using the wrong directory for "/bin").

I hope I have included enough to make it clear what I am doing with these malloc'd pointers now that I have included the rowDestructor() code. Thanks for the comments so far.

If there is inherently anything wrong with my C implementation I would like to fix it. In the meantime I will clean up my dev environment and see if I can get better results by ensuring the correct path to all components.

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4  
Where is the code for rowDestructor? –  Joshua Taylor Jun 6 '13 at 1:25
4  
Not your specific problem but (1) don't cast the return value of malloc in C, it can hide certain subtle errors; and (2) don't multiply by sizeof(char), it's never needed and just clogs up your code. –  paxdiablo Jun 6 '13 at 1:43
    
Are you freeing the struct before its members? free(row); free(row->colsIndex); ... -- that would do it. We can only speculate. It's crazy to say there's something wrong with rowDestructor() and then not show the code. –  paddy Jun 6 '13 at 2:25
    
Everyone here says to not cast your malloc, but there's no good reason not to. "Oh, no, if you don't include it, you won't find out until runtime".. who cares. Cast your mallocs and your code will likely compile with a c++ compiler, too, which is useful much of the time. I've never seen a single solid reason to not cast them. –  xaxxon Jun 6 '13 at 4:21
1  
Compile your code with most warnings on (-Wall for GCC) and fix the code until no more warnings pop up. Then compile with symbols (-g for GCC) and run the app using Valgrind. Fix the code until no more warnings/errors are given by Valgrind. –  alk Jun 6 '13 at 5:58

1 Answer 1

It turns out that my memory management was fine (no wonder I was pulling my hair out). I compiled this program on Linux, and quickly discovered an "off by one" error in allocating memory, and thus I was accessing some memory out of range. The program faults were immediate on the Linux box, whereas Windows would let the program run for a while before terminating it.

Here's where the problem lay, for those interested:

 row_t* delimitLine(char* line, char* delimList, char delimListSize)
{
//<Analyze "line" to count number of data fields>
.
.
.

This is how it was being done:

//Populate Row Data 
thisRow->numCols = numCols+1;   

This is how it was fixed:

//Populate Row Data 
numCols+=1;
thisRow->numCols = numCols; 

And here is a hint about why this was a problem

.
.
.
    //colsIndex
    thisRow->colsIndex = (int*) malloc(numCols*sizeof(int));
    if(thisRow->colsIndex==NULL) return NULL;   

    //rType
    thisRow->rType = (int*) malloc(numCols*sizeof(int));
    if(thisRow->rType==NULL) return NULL;   

    //iColVals
    thisRow->iColVals = (long*) malloc(numCols*sizeof(long));
    if(thisRow->iColVals==NULL) return NULL;    

    //dColVals
    thisRow->dColVals = (double*) malloc(numCols*sizeof(double));   
    if(thisRow->dColVals==NULL) return NULL;

thisRow->numCols was being used later in the program to access memory, while the memory had been allocated with "numCols", which would have been one element less than what the program was attempting to access.

Apparently the bad memory accesses were giving free() some trouble in releasing this memory. Interestingly, on the Linux box, this generated an immediate segmentation fault, which is why I was able to zero in on this more easily.

I can chalk this up to learning that sometimes when asking a question, even posting the "irrelevant" code can be important.

I solved it on my own, but thanks to all for your input. The fact that nobody pointed to an obvious "there's your flaw" urged me to dig a little deeper, and comment the sections of code that were not posted here.

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