Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a custom vagrant box for my team to use. The box is based off the base CentOS-x64-6.4-virtualbox-guest-additions-and-chef box. I vagrant up the VM and installed a bunch of software on it. With the software in place, I created a custom Vagrantfile and then packaged the box with vagrant package --output "my-custom-centos.box" --vagrantfile Vagrantfile and made it available.

Unfortunately, it turns out that when you pull down the shared box, the default shared directory that maps /vagrant on the box to the current working directory doesn't work (folder is empty). Furthermore, adding additional custom working directories also has no effect. I can't seem to find any good resources for how best to package custom vagrant boxes and haven't seen anything like shared directories not working. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you add --vagrantfile Vagrantfile to your package command, it embeds the Vagrantfile that the box was using into the package. I think the outermost Vagrantfile is supposed to take precedence over the others. The default shared folder is always where you set up your box (where your Vagrantfile and .vagrant folder are) and will change each time you start a box from a new place. When I make custom boxes, I leave the Vagrantfile out of the package and have not run into any problems with shared files. Hopefully some of that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
It definitely had to do with adding a custom Vagrantfile. So it looks like I can't provide default configurations and have to ask people to copy/paste around the vagrant configurations. Oh well. –  Arthur Maltson Jun 24 '13 at 18:08

I tried to package a box once and ran into all sorts of issues... its a little hard to speculate on the exact issue you are having but in my experience Vagrant can be a little picky.

I found it better to just use a working base box and make sure to include everything that needs to be installed within a provisioning script.

The easiest way to get started is probably just to use the shell provisioner where you can literally just get it to run all of the same commands you are already running. But if you want to do things in a more robust way you should check out Chef since the base box you using already includes it.

Using Chef you will be able to get everything installed that you need on your box in a repeatable and extendable way... it's really quite powerful once you get your head around it.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm building base boxes every couple of months and no issues til now –  cmur2 Jun 6 '13 at 17:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.