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Perl Newbie here and looking for some help.

I have a directory of files and a "keywords" file which has the attributes to search for and the attribute type.

For example:

Keywords.txt

Attribute1 boolean
Attribute2 boolean
Attribute3 search_and_extract
Attribute4 chunk

For each file in the directory, I have to:

  • lookup the keywords.txt
  • search based on Attribute type

something like the below.

IF attribute_type = boolean THEN
 search for attribute;
 set found = Y if attribute found;
ELSIF attribute_type = search_and_extract THEN
 extract string where attribute is Found
ELSIF attribute_type = chunk THEN
 extract the complete chunk of paragraph where attribute is found.

This is what I have so far and I'm sure there is a more efficient way to do this.

I'm hoping someone can guide me in the right direction to do the above. Thanks & regards, SiMa

# Reads attributes from config file
# First set boolean attributes. IF keyword is found in text, 
# variable flag is set to Y else N
# End Code: For each  text file in directory loop. 
# Run the below for each document.

use strict;
use warnings;

# open Doc
open(DOC_FILE,'Final_CLP.txt');
while(<DOC_FILE>) {
    chomp;
    # open the file
    open(FILE,'attribute_config.txt');
    while (<FILE>) {
        chomp;
        ($attribute,$attribute_type) = split("\t");

        $is_boolean = ($attribute_type eq "boolean") ? "N" : "Y";

        # For each boolean attribute, check if the keyword exists 
        # in the file and return Y or N
        if ($is_boolean eq "Y") {
            print "Yes\n";
            # search for keyword in doc and assign values
        }   

        print "Attribute: $attribute\n";
        print "Attribute_Type: $attribute_type\n";
        print "is_boolean: $is_boolean\n";
        print "-----------\n";
    }   
    close(FILE);
}
close(DOC_FILE);
exit;
share|improve this question
    
What is File_CLP.txt? You're not doing anything useful(open, chomp, close) with it. Your question isn't clear/complete. As I understand it: 1. Read Attributes file 2. Read contents of each file in a directory(recursively?) for your keyword 3. Return result is based on Attribute-type. Am I close? –  chrsblck Jun 6 '13 at 5:09
    
Yes, that is accurate. File_CLP.txt is just one file that I tried to work with. –  simak Jun 6 '13 at 8:21

1 Answer 1

It is a good idea to start your specs/question with a story ("I have a ..."). But such a story - whether true or made up, because you can't disclose the truth - should give

  • a vivid picture of the situation/problem/task
  • the reason(s) why all the work must be done
  • definitions for uncommon(ly used)terms

So I'd start with: I'm working in a prison and have to scan the emails of the inmates for

  • names (like "Al Capone") mentioned anywhere in the text; the director wants to read those mails in toto
  • order lines (like "weapon: AK 4711 quantity: 14"); the ordnance officer wants those info to calculate the amount of ammunition and rack space needed
  • paragraphs containing 'family'-keywords like "wife", "child", ...; the parson wants to prepare her sermons efficiently

Taken for itself, each of the terms "keyword" (~running text) and "attribute" (~structured text) of may be 'clear', but if both are applied to "the X I have to search for", things get mushy. Instead of general ("chunk") and technical ("string") terms, you should use 'real-world' (line) and specific (paragraph) words. Samples of your input:

From: Robin Hood
To: Scarface

Hi Scarface,

tell Al Capone to send a car to the prison gate on sunday.

For the riot we need:

weapon: AK 4711 quantity: 14
knife: Bowie quantity: 8

Tell my wife in Folsom to send some money to my son in
Alcatraz.

Regards
Robin

and your expected output:

--- Robin.txt ----
keywords:
  Al Capone: Yes
  Billy the Kid: No
  Scarface: Yes
order lines:
  knife:
    knife: Bowie quantity: 8
  machine gun:
  stinger rocket:
  weapon:
    weapon: AK 4711 quantity: 14
social relations paragaphs:
  Tell my wife in Folsom to send some money to my son in
  Alcatraz.

Pseudo code should begin at the top level. If you start with

for each file in folder
    load search list
    process current file('s content) using search list

it's obvious that

load search list
for each file in folder
    process current file using search list

would be much better.

Based on this story, examples, and top level plan, I would try to come up with proof of concept code for a simplified version of the "process current file('s content) using search list" task:

given file/text to search in and list of keywords/attributes

print file name
print "keywords:"
for each boolean item
  print boolean item text
  if found anywhere in whole text
     print "Yes"
  else
     print "No"
print "order line:"
for each line item
  print line item text
  if found anywhere in whole text
     print whole line
print "social relations paragaphs:"
for each paragraph
    for each social relation item
        if found
           print paragraph
           no need to check for other items

first implementation attempt:

use Modern::Perl;

#use English qw(-no_match_vars);
use English;

exit step_00();

sub step_00 {
  # given file/text to search in
  my $whole_text = <<"EOT";
From: Robin Hood
To: Scarface

Hi Scarface,

tell Al Capone to send a car to the prison gate on sunday.

For the riot we need:

weapon: AK 4711 quantity: 14
knife: Bowie quantity: 8

Tell my wife in Folsom to send some money to my son in
Alcatraz.

Regards
Robin
EOT

  #  print file name
  say "--- Robin.txt ---";
  # print "keywords:"
  say "keywords:";
  # for each boolean item
  for my $bi ("Al Capone", "Billy the Kid", "Scarface") {
  #   print boolean item text
      printf " %s: ", $bi;
  #   if found anywhere in whole text
      if ($whole_text =~ /$bi/) {
  #      print "Yes"
         say "Yes";
  #   else
      } else {
  #      print "No"
         say "No";
      }
  }
  # print "order line:"
  say "order lines:";
  # for each line item
  for my $li ("knife", "machine gun", "stinger rocket", "weapon") {
  #   print line item text
  #   if found anywhere in whole text
      if ($whole_text =~ /^$li.*$/m) {
  #      print whole line
         say " ", $MATCH;
      }
  }
  # print "social relations paragaphs:"
  say "social relations paragaphs:";
  # for each paragraph
  for my $para (split /\n\n/, $whole_text) {
  #     for each social relation item
        for my $sr ("wife", "son", "husband") {
  #         if found
            if ($para =~ /$sr/) {
        ##  if ($para =~ /\b$sr\b/) {
  #            print paragraph
               say $para;
  #            no need to check for other items
               last;
            }
        }
  }
  return 0;
}

output:

perl 16953439.pl
--- Robin.txt ---
keywords:
 Al Capone: Yes
 Billy the Kid: No
 Scarface: Yes
order lines:
 knife: Bowie quantity: 8
 weapon: AK 4711 quantity: 14
social relations paragaphs:
tell Al Capone to send a car to the prison gate on sunday.
Tell my wife in Folsom to send some money to my son in
Alcatraz.

Such (premature) code helps you to

  • clarify your specs (Should not-found keywords go into the output?
  • Is your search list really flat or should it be structured/grouped?)
  • check your assumptions about how to do things (Should the order line search be done on the array of lines of thw whole text?)
  • identify topics for further research/rtfm (eg. regex (prison!))
  • plan your next steps (folder loop, read input file)

(in addition, people in the know will point out all my bad practices, so you can avoid them from the start)

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
First off, thank you very much for your detailed response. Where you had the file in-line, I'm guessing I'd open a FILE while looping through the directory? Is that correct? Trying your approach now. Will let you know how it goes. Thanks again! –  simak Jun 6 '13 at 11:12

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