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I have an Excel spreadsheet that has a field containing small %f.2 values, such as 1.2, 1.07, 2.3, etc and for some reason openpyxl is reading these cells as a 1900 date. I have seen a variety of times this issue has been raised, but usually these users are expecting a date and are getting a bogus date. I am expecting a value, usually x<10.0 and i am getting about 30-40% 'bad' data (read as timedate), while the other time this is read as a numeric value.

I am using iterators, so I do a simple ws.iter_rows() call to pull the data one row at a time. I have tried to 'cast' this to a previously created variable containing a numeric value, but this doesn't do much good.

Does anyone have a suggestion on how to overcome this sporadic issue. If this is a known bug, are there any known workarounds?

I find that if I store the file as a csv, and re-open it as csv, then re-store it as xlsx I will end up with a file that I can read correctly. While this helps debug the code, I need a solution that my customer can use without jumping through these hoops.

I would think that if the column was not formatted correctly it would apply to all elements, so having this occur intermittently is confusing.

import openpyxl
from openpyxl import load_workbook

# Source workbook - wb

wb = load_workbook(filename = r'C:\data\TEST.xlsx' , use_iterators = True)
ws = wb.get_sheet_by_name(name ='QuoteFile ')

for row in ws.iter_rows():
        print(row[0].internal_value ,row[3].internal_value ,row[4].internal_value         ,row[5].internal_value)


print('Done')

Here is my input as seen from an excel table

20015   2.13    1.2 08/01/11
20015   5.03    1.2 08/01/11
20015   5.03    1.2 08/01/11
20015   5.51    1.2 08/01/11
20015   8.13    1.2 08/01/11
20015   5.60    1.2 08/01/11
20015   5.03    1.2 08/01/11
20015   1.50    1.2 08/01/11
20015   1.50    1.2 08/01/11
20015   1.50    1.2 08/01/11
20015   1.50    1.2 08/01/11
20015   1.50    1.2 08/01/11
20015   1.50    1.2 08/01/11

Here is my output, you can see the first seven rows indicate the second field as a date from 1900, while rows 8-13 show the field correctly as a numeric field:

20015.0 1900-01-02 03:07:12 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1900-01-05 00:43:12 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1900-01-05 00:43:12 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1900-01-05 12:14:24 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1900-01-08 03:07:12 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1900-01-05 14:24:00 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1900-01-05 00:43:12 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1.5 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1.5 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1.5 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1.5 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1.5 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00
20015.0 1.5 1.2 2011-08-01 00:00:00

using python 3.3 and openpyxl 1.6.2

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Disclaimer: I have no idea how to work openpyxl. However, I'm pretty good with the datetime module.

If you know which rows are supposed to be numbers, I've got a one liner lambda function that will convert an Excel date-format to a float, and ignore it if it's a number.

We could use this code in such a way:

import datetime
import openpyxl
from openpyxl import load_workbook

# Source workbook - wb

wb = load_workbook(filename = r'C:\data\TEST.xlsx' , use_iterators = True)
ws = wb.get_sheet_by_name(name ='QuoteFile ')

# Quick explanation:
# If it's a number, return it. Otherwise, take the difference between the datetime
# and 1899-12-31 00:00:00. The way the datetimes work is they're internally a float,
# being the number of days since the start of 1900. We get the number of seconds in
# the delta (done through subtraction) and divide that by 86400 (the number of seconds
# in a day).
forcefloat = lambda val : val if type(val) in (int,float) else (
                         (val - datetime.datetime(1899,12,31,0,0,0)).total_seconds() / 86400)

for row in ws.iter_rows():
        print(row[0].internal_value ,forcefloat(row[3].internal_value) ,row[4].internal_value         ,row[5].internal_value)


print('Done')

Not exactly the most elegant solution, but it works.

share|improve this answer
    
I think we are making progress. Thanks for the hint about type(val), this helped me understand what the row iteration returns. The problem is that it returns type 'datetime.datetime'. The strptime(val...) doesn't seem to like a datetime.datetime passed to it, but expects a string. I have gone through a couple conversions (datetime.datetime --> string --> strptime and this appears to work correctly. Now I just need two wrap this into your lambda. Thanks for the hint on datetime. –  Joel Jun 6 '13 at 15:21
    
Oh, well that's even easier. I'll edit the question to match. the strptime part was actually converting a string to datetime.datetime. If we've already got a datetime.datetime, we can just skip the string part. –  Kupiakos Jun 6 '13 at 15:22
    
Works like a charm! Thanks again. –  Joel Jun 6 '13 at 15:39
    
Please remember to mark an answer as correct if it is ;-> –  Kupiakos Jun 6 '13 at 15:40
    
Thanks for the reminder. new to the etiquette here. Done and done. Cheers. –  Joel Jun 6 '13 at 16:05

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