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I'm trying to write a program to see if string 1 is a part of string 2. At the command prompt, I enter string 1, and then string 2. But the problem is, no matter what I type, my program keeps printing out the answer that "No, string 1 is not a part of string 2". I'm not sure what I could be doing wrong, is there something wrong with my for loop? Help is appreciated!

int string_part_of_other(void)
{
   char str1[20];
   char str2[20];
   int answer = 1;

   printf("Enter string 1:\n");
   scanf("%s", str1);

   printf("Enter string 2:\n");
   scanf("%s", str2);

   for (int i = 0; str1[i] != '\0'; i++)
   {
      for (int j = 0; str2[j] != '\0'; j++)
      {
         if (str1[i] != str2[j])
         {
            answer = 0;
         }
      }
   }

   return answer;
}

int main()
{
   int result;
   result = string_part_of_other();

   if (result == 1)
   {
      printf("Yes, string 1 is part of string 2.\n");
   }

   if (result == 0)
   {
      printf("No, string 1 is not part of string 2.\n");
   }

   return 0;
}
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1  
Fundamentally, because the algorithm is wrong. You set answer to 0 on the first mismatch, but never reset it to 1. You should probably invert the logic. If you find every character in string 2 in a stretch of string 1, return 1 from the function (in the body of the inner loop). Otherwise, return 0 at the end of the function. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 6 '13 at 5:43
    
this logic is incorrect.. your "answer" variable is always 0 if ever there is a different character in both strings. –  Denny Mathew Jun 6 '13 at 5:44
    
@Jonathan Leffer - I don't believe your comment is correct. Consider the array indices that are being compared, there is something more fundamentally broken. –  patros Jun 6 '13 at 5:46
    
You need to modify your logic.You are comparing every single character of string 1 with complete str2 string, which is wrong. –  Rohan Salunkhe Jun 6 '13 at 5:47
    
@patros: I don't see what you're suggesting. I see code comparing str1[i] with str2[j], which at least compares two characters from two different strings, with index i scanning over str1 and index j scanning over str2. That much seems about right. There are problems with the chosen algorithm, but ... –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 6 '13 at 5:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is in your loop. You're comparing an entire string against one character.

for (int i = 0; str1[i] != '\0'; i++){
   for (int j = 0; str2[j] != '\0'; j++){ // here
      if (str1[i] != str2[j]) answer = 0; 
   }
}

strpbrk or strstr is a function that does this automatically, if that's what you would prefer.

You could also try this:

for (int i = 0; str1[i]; i++){
    int j = 0;
    for (; str2[j] && str1[i + j]; j++){
        if (str2[j] != str1[i + j]) break;
    }
    if (!str2[j]) return 1; /*
    * This means the loop broke because it reached the end of the
    * string, not because of a mismatch. Therefore, str2 is within str1
    */
}

return 0;

Also, I think it is your intention to say string 2 is part of string 1, and not the other way around.

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2  
The overall function is strstr()... –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 6 '13 at 5:46
    
Thanks! I appreciate the comments about functions that already do this, but I need to practice programming! :) And I see what you're saying, so if I wanted to compare the two strings, I would have to use strcmp() right?? –  Karen Jun 6 '13 at 5:50
    
@Karen For comparing strings, yes. But for finding substrings, no. –  user529758 Jun 6 '13 at 5:52
    
Ah, I see...hmm... –  Karen Jun 6 '13 at 5:53
    
@Karen: using strcmp() works to compare strings for sorting in order, but doesn't handle comparing substrings (which you'd need to do). You want to find out if str2 exists as a string in str1. Apart from heading off wasted effort if str2 is longer than str1 (it will never be found), you do then dive into a double loop, unless you get fancy with Boyer-Moore or Knuth-Morris-Pratt or some other more sophisticated string search algorithm. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 6 '13 at 5:53

The algorithm you've written answers the following:

"For each character in string1, does it match every character in string2?"

If you step through the code in your head you should be able to figure out what's going wrong, and how to fix it.

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For example, if your last char in str1 and last char in str2 do not match each other, the answer will be 0. Even if str2 is a part of str1

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Few remarks:

  • don't use scanf(). It doesn't do what you think it does, and it even goes unprotected without the ability to specify field width, so you should expect buffer overruns.

  • so use fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), stdin) instead (and beware of trailing newlines).

  • Don't reinvent the wheel: there's a function called strstr() in the C standard library which does exactly what you want, and it works correctly unlike your current ugly-hack-with-unreadable-nested-for-loops.

All in all:

int part_of()
{
    char buf1[LINE_MAX], buf2[LINE_MAX], *p;
    fgets(buf1, sizeof(buf1), stdin);
    fgets(buf2, sizeof(buf2), stdin);

    p = strchr(buf1, '\n');
    if (p) *p = 0;
    p = strchr(buf2, '\n');
    if (p) *p = 0;

    return strstr(buf1, buf2) != NULL;
}

Also, don't write if (func() == 1) {} then if (func() == 0) {} immediately afterwards - redundancy is bad. if (func()) {} else {} is fine.

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you are just comparing all characters of str1 with that of str2 and even if one mismatch is there you set answer to zero .. wrong logic based on asked question I am assuming you want to check str1 to be a part of str2, the outer loop should be of the parent or containing string in this case str2 ...

    int answer=0;
    for(int i=0;str2[i]!='\0';i++) //traversing bigger string
    {
    if(str2[i]==str1[0])
    //if character of bigger string matches first  character small string
    {
    for(int j=0;str1[j]!='\0';j++)
    { 
    if(((i+j)<strlen(str2))&&(str1[j]!=str2[i+j])){
    break;}
    }//j
    if(str1[j-1]=='\0')
    {answer=1;
     break;}
    }//i
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if (str1[i] != str2[j]) {
            answer = 0;
}

If the 1st literal in your string1 does not match with string2 answer is set to 0, after that even if you find the substring you are not changing answer to 1 so you are not getting the proper result.

Also you are just incrementing str2 index and not incrementing str1 index with it, so you will never find the string, so change the logic.

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I rewrite some of your code:

#include <stdio.h>

int string_part_of_other(void)
{
   char str1[20];
   char str2[20];
   int answer = 0;
   int i, j, k;

   printf("Enter string 1:\n");
   scanf("%s", str1);

   printf("Enter string 2:\n");
   scanf("%s", str2);

   i = j = k =0;

   while(str2[j] !='\0')
   {
       k = j;
       for(i = 0; str1[i] != '\0' && str2[k] != '\0'; i++, k++)
       {
           if(str1[i] != str2[k])
           {
               break;
           }
       }

       if(str1[i] == '\0')
       {
           answer = 1;
       }
       j++;

   }

   return answer;
}

int main()
{
   int result;
   result = string_part_of_other();

   if (result == 1)
   {
      printf("Yes, string 1 is part of string 2.\n");
   }

   if (result == 0)
   {
      printf("No, string 1 is not part of string 2.\n");
   }

   return 0;
}
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