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Ok, my actual problem was this: I was implementing an IList<T>. When I got to CopyTo(Array array, int index), this was my solution:

void ICollection.CopyTo(Array array, int index)
{
    // Bounds checking, etc here.
    if (!(array.GetValue(0) is T))
        throw new ArgumentException("Cannot cast to this type of Array.");
    // Handle copying here.
}

This worked in my original code, and still works. But it has a small flaw, which wasn't exposed till I started building tests for it, specifically this one:

public void CopyToObjectArray()
{
    ICollection coll = (ICollection)_list;
    string[] testArray = new string[6];

    coll.CopyTo(testArray, 2);
}

Now, this test should pass. It throws the ArgumentException about not being able to cast. Why? array[0] == null. The is keyword always returns false when checking a variable that is set to null. Now, this is handy for all sorts of reasons, including avoiding null dereferences, etc. What I finally came up with for my type checking was this:

try
{
    T test = (T)array.GetValue(0);
}
catch (InvalidCastException ex)
{
    throw new ArgumentException("Cannot cast to this type of Array.", ex);
}

This isn't exactly elegant, but it works... Is there a better way though?

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The only way to be sure is with reflection, but 90% of the time you can avoid the cost of that by using array is T[]. Most people are going to pass a properly typed array in, so that will do. But, you should always provide the code to do the reflection check as well, just in case. Here's what my general boiler-plate looks like (note: I wrote this here, from memory, so this might not compile, but it should give the basic idea):

class MyCollection : ICollection<T> {
   void ICollection<T>.CopyTo(T[] array, int index) {
       // Bounds checking, etc here.
       CopyToImpl(array, index);
   }
   void ICollection.CopyTo(Array array, int index) {
       // Bounds checking, etc here.
       if (array is T[]) { // quick, avoids reflection, but only works if array is typed as exactly T[]
           CopyToImpl((T[])localArray, index);
       } else {
           Type elementType = array.GetType().GetElementType();
           if (!elementType.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)) && !typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(elementType)) {
               throw new Exception();
           }
           CopyToImpl((object[])array, index);
       }
   }
   private void CopyToImpl(object[] array, int index) {
       // array will always have a valid type by this point, and the bounds will be checked
       // Handle the copying here
   }
}

EDIT: Ok, forgot to point something out. A couple answers naively used what, in this code, reads as element.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)) only. You should also allow typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(elementType), as the BCL does, in case a developer knows that all of the values in this specific ICollection are actually of a type S derived from T, and passes an array of type S[]

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How do you suggest handling the case where not all elements are of a type S, and a InvalidCastException gets thrown? User beware? –  Matthew Scharley Oct 4 '08 at 3:10
    
That's the way the BCL does it. –  Alex Lyman Oct 4 '08 at 4:39
    
The "is" keyword in C# is a reflection call. So you're not saving much by going the long way around the track. Just cut right to the chase and do the IsAssignableFrom. –  justin.m.chase Feb 13 '09 at 14:36
    
@just in case: Actually in this case "is" is implemented via the "isinst" CIL instruction (ECMA-225 Partition III, Section 4.6). While technically the JIT is allowed to call reflection to implement it, both MS-CLR and Mono have very efficient inline code for it (it also runs every time you unbox) –  Alex Lyman Feb 14 '09 at 4:29
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There is a method on Type specifically for this, try:

if(!typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(array.GetElementType()))
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Using reflection is surely going to be more expensive than just going for the invalid cast. –  Jeff Yates Oct 4 '08 at 2:19
    
+1 for effort, and a solution that works. Performance wise though, I think I have to side with ffpf, Reflection is probably taking the long route around. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 4 '08 at 2:24
    
Thinking about it (and having a mental slap), I think this is probably the only way to do this properly. –  Jeff Yates Oct 4 '08 at 2:32
    
As a single conditional statement anyway, yeah. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 4 '08 at 2:40
    
It would only be faster to use the try / catch if the cast happened to be correct. If you have an exception thrown and you catch it here then you are going to see a drastic performance hit vs. an extremely minor one with reflection. Don't be afraid of reflection, it is still pretty fast. –  justin.m.chase Feb 13 '09 at 14:31
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List<T> uses this:

try
{
    Array.Copy(this._items, 0, array, index, this.Count);
}
catch (ArrayTypeMismatchException)
{
  //throw exception...
}
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Ugly. I would rather it just bubble up the exception. –  Jonathan Allen Oct 4 '08 at 4:34
    
List<T> throws an ArgumentException, which is more appropriate –  Mark Cidade Oct 4 '08 at 4:46
    
Since you're taking the effort though, I'd probably pass the ArrayTypeMismatch as an inner exception though. –  Matthew Scharley Oct 4 '08 at 6:40
    
List<T> has T already... so it's pretty easy to make sure you have the right type. –  justin.m.chase Feb 13 '09 at 14:33
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Here is a little test of try / catch vs. reflection:

object[] obj = new object[] { };
DateTime start = DateTime.Now;

for (int x = 0; x < 1000; x++)
{
    try
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }
    catch (Exception ex) { }
}
DateTime end = DateTime.Now;
Console.WriteLine("Try/Catch: " + (end - start).TotalSeconds.ToString());

start = DateTime.Now;

for (int x = 0; x < 1000; x++)
{
    bool assignable = typeof(int).IsAssignableFrom(obj.GetType().GetElementType());
}
end = DateTime.Now;
Console.WriteLine("IsAssignableFrom: " + (end - start).TotalSeconds.ToString());

The resulting output in Release mode is:

Try/Catch: 1.7501001
IsAssignableFrom: 0

In debug mode:

Try/Catch: 1.8171039
IsAssignableFrom: 0.0010001

Conclusion, just do the reflection check. It's worth it.

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Of course... you are assuming that it will throw each time! –  François Feb 13 '09 at 15:08
    
You always make that assumption when calculating performance. –  justin.m.chase Feb 21 '09 at 20:36
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