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In Python, is it safe to give keyword arguments that are not Python identifiers to a function? Here is an example:

>>> '{x-y}'.format(**{'x-y': 3})  # The keyword argument is *not* a valid Python identifier
'3'
>>> '{x-y}'.format(x-y=3)
  File "<ipython-input-12-722afdf7cfa3>", line 1
SyntaxError: keyword can't be an expression

I am asking this because it is more convenient for me to format with names that contain a dash (because the values correspond to command-line argument with dashes in their name). But is this behavior reliable (i.e. can it vary between version of Python)?

I am not sure that using non-identifiers as keyword arguments is officially supported: in fact, the documentation reads:

If the syntax **expression appears in the function call, expression must evaluate to a mapping, the contents of which are treated as additional keyword arguments.

… where "keyword arguments" are defined as having a name which is an identifier:

keyword_arguments ::= keyword_item ("," keyword_item)*

keyword_item ::= identifier "=" expression

where identifiers are restricted in what characters they can use (- is for instance forbidden):

identifier ::= (letter|"_") (letter | digit | "_")*

So, the documentation indicates that the mapping given to ** in a function call should only contain valid identifiers as keys, but CPython 2.7 accepts more general keys (for format() and functions with a ** argument, which do not put values in variables). Is this a reliable feature?

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2  
The convention is to replace - with _ in names to make them valid identifiers. The **{...} call convention with non-identifier names only works if the called function has a **kw argument to receive them, as it too cannot define explicit keyword arguments that are not valid identifiers. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 6 '13 at 7:45
    
Indeed, but can this be relied on? If using non-identifiers for ** arguments is guaranteed to work, then this is more convenient, in my case (the dictionary keys are directly command-line option names). –  EOL Jun 6 '13 at 7:48
    
I think it's safe to use it because I strongly doubt that function kwargs and ** will ever be changed to accept on some special kind of mapping that restricts its keys to valid python identifiers. –  martineau Jun 6 '13 at 7:53
    
I'd say that the grammar only applies to the parser of the source code, and should not be seen as a functional restriction on the contents of the **expression result. The functional description below does not restrict the keys of the dictionary explicitly, nor does the function definition documentation. It would be a huge backwards-compatibility nightmare to ever explicitly restrict that, so you are safe. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 6 '13 at 7:55
1  
@EOL: That is what I am saying; the formal grammar does not restrict what is in the keywords dictionary; the formal grammar only restricts what the source defining keyword arguments should look like. The grammar for dictionaries does not limit keys (but the spec does limit keys to immutables). –  Martijn Pieters Jun 6 '13 at 8:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all: the **{...} call convention with non-identifier names only works if the called function has a **kw argument to receive them, as it too cannot define explicit keyword arguments that are not valid identifiers.

I'd say that the keyword_arguments grammar only applies to the parser of the source code, and cannot ever be seen as a functional restriction on the contents of the **expression result. The functional description below does not restrict the keys of the dictionary explicitly, nor does the function definition documentation.

Instead, since the grammar allows an expression, and the functional spec states that that should resolve to a mapping the contents of which are treated as additional keyword arguments, it is clear (to me) that there are no restrictions on the keys at all, beyond the normal ones applicable to Python dictionaries (keys must be immutable). You can pass in tuple or numeric keys for all Python cares. The functional spec states how the contents are treated, not that the contents must fit a certain format.

So, in my opinion the functional spec would have to explicitly restrict the keys in the **expression dictionary to disallow what you are doing, because the grammar certainly does not. Changing that would be a huge backwards-incompatible change, and is not likely to ever be added.

Note that even though the spec doesn't mention any restrictions on the keys of the dictionary, CPython does:

>>> def f(*args, **kw): print args, kw
... 
>>> f(**{1: 2})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: f() keywords must be strings

This is a restriction made by the python interpreter when invoking code objects (user defined functions). The reason why is explained in the source code right after the part that raises the above exception:

/* Speed hack: do raw pointer compares. As names are
   normally interned this should almost always hit. */

By restricting keywords to strings a speed optimisation is possible.

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The kw dict keys do already have to be strings: try def foo(**kw): pass; foo(**{1: 5}). This gives a TypeError in Python 2.7 and 3.3. –  lvc Jun 6 '13 at 8:36
    
@lvc: Indeed; interesting, so CPython does apply restrictions in code that the spec doesn't mention. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 6 '13 at 8:38
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@lvc, kw dict keys have to be strings, except that in the format method they don't '{x-y}'.format(**{'x-y': 3, 4:5}) doesn't throw the expected exception. –  Duncan Jun 6 '13 at 8:40
    
@MartijnPieters I think there was a discussion about this on the dev mailing list recently. From memory the conclusion was that CPython can't reject non-strings without slowing down calls, but implementations aren't required to accept invalid identifiers. I may have misremembered though: I haven't found the relevant posts yet. –  Duncan Jun 6 '13 at 8:44
2  
Yeah, if I've got time later today I'll troll through the commit history and see what I can dig up. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 6 '13 at 9:22

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