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Let's say I have this two Arrays:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
b = [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

What I want to get is a Hash as follows:

c = { 1 => [1, 6], 2 => [2, 7], 3 => [3, 8], 4 => [4, 9], 5 => [5, 10] }

The only way I've come across so far is as follows:

# Initialize the resulting Hash and fill in the keys.
c = {}
(a.length).times { |i| c[i + 1] = [] }

# Fill values
c.each_with_index do |(key), idx|
  c[key] = [a[idx], b[idx]]
end

Does Ruby have a better or pretty way to do this?

Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Functional approach:

Hash[a.zip(b).map.with_index(1) { |pair, idx| [idx, pair] }]
#=> {1=>[1, 6], 2=>[2, 7], 3=>[3, 8], 4=>[4, 9], 5=>[5, 10]}

Just for fun, and if you like to build your own abstractions: the previous snippet is more verbose than it should because of with_index, firstly it works only on enumerators (not enumerables), secondly it puts the value as the second element (it would be more useful as the first, that's what most of other languages do). What could we do? add our own Enumerable#indexed method that worked the other way around. At this point we'd be compelled to also add Enumerable#to_h, so finally we'd be able to write this pure OOP, left-to-right, declarative code:

a.zip(b).indexed(1).to_h
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Can with_index(1, &:reverse) work? –  sawa Jun 6 '13 at 8:45
    
@sawa: Nope, but I am not sure why. –  tokland Jun 6 '13 at 8:47
2  
I see. I was wrong. I figured out why. When using to_proc and the block takes multiple block arguments, the first one becomes the receiver and the rest the arguments. –  sawa Jun 6 '13 at 8:51
1  
@sawa @tokland Interesting. Hash[ a.zip(b).map.with_index(1).to_a.map &:reverse ] gives it, but Enumerator#map &:reverse gives error. Looking for explanation. –  Jokester Jun 6 '13 at 8:51
1  
@jokester Right after with_index, the enumerator is capable of giving two block arguments. to_a changes that into one object. –  sawa Jun 6 '13 at 9:04
c = Hash[(1..a.size).zip(a.zip(b))]

This takes advantage of Hash's key-value pair initializer.

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+1 a double zip is slight less declarative but I also like it. IMHO the problem is that indexations in Ruby are wrong, they are more useful as the first element, not the last. And then we could write Hash[a.zip(b).indexed(1)] or something like that. –  tokland Jun 6 '13 at 8:45
    
+1 to you as well, I was inspired by your answer :D –  Chris Schmich Jun 6 '13 at 8:51
    
Or in your special case, where a contains the keys, even shorter Hash[a.zip(a.zip(b))] –  ovhaag Jun 6 '13 at 11:28

Does Ruby have a better or pretty way to this?

Of course, it does!

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
b = [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

c = a.zip(b).each.with_index.with_object({}) do |(arr, idx), memo|
  memo[idx + 1] = arr
end

c # => {1=>[1, 6], 2=>[2, 7], 3=>[3, 8], 4=>[4, 9], 5=>[5, 10]}
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You already got a number of great answers. I will add two more just for diversity.

Hash[(0...a.size).map{ |i| [i+1, [a[i], b[i]]] } ]

or

(0...a.size).each_with_object({}) { |i, h| h[i+1] = [a[i], b[i]] }

I would argue that the versions are easier to read and understand. :) However, that's a matter of taste.

UPDATE:

I caaaaaannot stop. :-) Here is one more:

a.zip(b).each_with_object({}) { |p, h| h[h.size+1] = p }
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