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From assert.h file in C:

#define assert(expr)    	(__ASSERT_VOID_CAST (0))

I wonder what is (__ASSERT_VOID_CAST (0))? I try to find its implementation but could not find anywhere.

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3 Answers 3

In the assert.h on my particular system it says:

#if defined __cplusplus && __GNUC_PREREQ (2,95)
# define __ASSERT_VOID_CAST static_cast<void>
#else
# define __ASSERT_VOID_CAST (void)
#endif

So it's a cast to void, and the reason to use it is to avoid warnings about unsed values when NDEBUG is set to true.

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Well, __ASSERT_VOID_CAST will be another macro somewhere, and when asserts are 'tuned off' it will expand to something equivalent with

((void) 0)

which is a way to get a void expression. In older implementations assert() just expanded to an empty string, but a void-expression will let you use the comma-operator to do wriggle it into an expression, like:

while(assert(n > 0), k/n > 10) { ... }
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Wouldn't a simple 0, without the void cast, work as well there? –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Nov 8 '09 at 9:38
2  
A simple 0; gives 'warning: statement with no effect' when used as a statement. So it might work for the while fragment, it won't do for the more common use of assert() as a statement. –  Pete Kirkham Nov 8 '09 at 9:43
1  
@Thomas - yes it would. but remember that the assert() macro is defined as being a void expression. So having it expand to a simple 0 would be incorrect. –  Michael Burr Nov 8 '09 at 9:44

From assert.h, a few lines above the definition of assert (linux, kubuntu):

#if defined __cplusplus && __GNUC_PREREQ (2,95)
# define __ASSERT_VOID_CAST static_cast<void>
#else
# define __ASSERT_VOID_CAST (void)
#endif
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