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I have interface A which defined 3 methods that should implement and class B must is implementing all three methods. No problem. But in class C also i'm implementing the interface A so I have to write the implementation for all three methods. But my class C doesn't want the doSomthing3().

I'm just giving here an example but my real application is a large one with many methods.

Assume I have 100 sub classes that implement interface A and now I want 50 classes to have another new method which I can put in interface A. But then do I have to implement it in all 100 sub classes? How come I avoid to inherit unwanted method.

public interface A {

   public void doSomething1();
   public void doSomething2();
   public void doSomething3();

 }

public class B implements A{
   public void doSomething1(){
      System.out.println("doSomething 1");
   }

   public void doSomething2(){
      System.out.println("doSomething 2");
   }

   public void doSomething3(){
      System.out.println("doSomething 3");
   }

}

public class C implements A{

   public void doSomething1(){
      System.out.println("doSomething 1");
   }

   public void doSomething2(){
      System.out.println("doSomething 2");
   }

   public void doSomething3(){ /*Do nothing in this class */  }

}
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2  
You are not inheriting interface , you are just following the contract of implementation . –  NINCOMPOOP Jun 6 '13 at 9:41

4 Answers 4

You could create two interfaces. One will contains the methods that you will implement in both classes and the other one the extra method that you want for the other class. Then just implement the right interface to the right class.

public interface A {

   public void doSomething1();
   public void doSomething2();

 }

public interface B extends A {

   public void doSomething3();

 }

Then

public class ClassB implements B{
   public void doSomething1(){
      System.out.println("doSomething 1");
   }

   public void doSomething2(){
      System.out.println("doSomething 2");
   }

   public void doSomething3(){
      System.out.println("doSomething 3");
   }

}


public class ClassA implements A{

       public void doSomething1(){
          System.out.println("doSomething 1");
       }

       public void doSomething2(){
          System.out.println("doSomething 2");
       }

    }
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This issue is solved by introducing such called Adapter: this is an abstract class, which implements all methods from inherited interface. In your desired class you could override only that methods, which you want:

public abstract class AAdapter implements A(){
   public void doSomething1(){
   }

   public void doSomething2(){
   }

   public void doSomething3(){
   }
}

and in your class:

public class C extends AAdapter(){

   @Override
   public void doSomething1(){
      system.out.println("doSomething 1");
   }

   @Override
   public void doSomething2(){
      system.out.println("doSomething 2");
   }
}
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You can create a simple implementation of your interface that always trigger NoSuchMethodError or any other runtime exception.

And then simply extends that class and override only the useful methods.

Or as stated in another answer, you might consider redesigning your interfaces.

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You can consider creating stub implementation:

public class SimpleA implements A {

  @Override
  public void doSomething1() {
    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
  }

  // rest omitted

}

Now your classes can extend SimpleA and override only needed methods.

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