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What's the best way to write

int NumDigits(int n);

in C++ which would return the number of digits in the decimal representation of the input. For example 11->2, 999->3, -1->2 etc etc.

share|improve this question
    
What do you do about negative numbers? – Josh Lee Nov 8 '09 at 11:27
    
Thanks I didn't think of that - I've edited the question to clarify. – jjerms Nov 8 '09 at 11:29
3  
"Best" is a subjective term. Please use a more concrete term such as "fastest", "shortest", etc. – paxdiablo Nov 8 '09 at 11:47
3  
@paxdiablo: "Best" is a subjective term. That's why it leads to a wide range of interesting answers :) – Artelius Nov 8 '09 at 11:50
1  
THE best way is to ask it on StackOverflow :P – Jorge Córdoba Nov 8 '09 at 13:28

13 Answers 13

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Clean and fast, and independent of sizeof(int):

int NumDigits(int n) {
    int digits = 0;
    if (n <= 0) {
        n = -n;
        ++digits;
    }
    while (n) {
        n /= 10;
        ++digits;
    }
    return digits;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A little cleaner than mine. +1! – Drew Hall Nov 8 '09 at 12:10
    
You just need to be wary with the negation here. -INT_MIN may be problematic and, in any case. C/C++ doesn't guarantee 2s complement. You could technically have INT_MIN of -32768 and INT_MAX of 2 – paxdiablo Nov 8 '09 at 12:28
1  
paxdiablo, INT_MAX is guaranteed to be at least 32767. – avakar Nov 8 '09 at 12:50
    
...which of course does not really invalidate your comment. Just nitpicking. – avakar Nov 8 '09 at 12:51
1  
Though, in C++0x the behavior is defined to truncate :) See open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html#614 – Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 8 '09 at 14:57
//Works for positive integers only
int DecimalLength(int n) {
    return floor(log10f(n) + 1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not hard to tweak this to handle negative, 0 properly... – Drew Hall Nov 8 '09 at 11:34
    
I'd add 0.9 to n, on the off chance the log10f gets rounded down for some power of 10 (or test all such edge cases if it's to be deployed on one hardware system only). – Pete Kirkham Nov 8 '09 at 11:34
9  
Very iffy. I'd never reach for floating-point arithmetic if integer arithmetic should suffice. – Thomas Nov 8 '09 at 12:06
1  
@Thomas, I don't think loop (even small one) will be faster than logarithm calculation. – vava Nov 8 '09 at 12:28
1  
I don't think Thomas' comment was about speed -- using float-point makes programs harder to reason about. Anyway, there is no log10f in C++ (yet, use log10((float)n) for now) and floor is unnecessary. – avakar Nov 8 '09 at 12:46

The fastest way is probably a binary search...

//assuming n is positive
if (n < 10000)
    if (n < 100)
        if (n < 10)
            return 1;
        else
            return 2;
    else
        if (n < 1000)
            return 3;
        else
            return 4;
 else
     //etc up to 1000000000

In this case it's about 3 comparisons regardless of input, which I suspect is much faster than a division loop or using doubles.

share|improve this answer
    
That said, if there's some magic optimisation of this, then the division loop is probably the best way to express it for the compiler to be able to apply that optimisation. – Artelius Nov 8 '09 at 11:41
    
Quicker still would be a lookup table--if you don't mind using your whole memory space for that... :) Still, an elegant solution but you'll want a lot of test cases! – Drew Hall Nov 8 '09 at 11:57
    
...did I say elegant? I meant smart & efficient. It's ugly as sin but would blow the doors off my division loop in practice! :) – Drew Hall Nov 8 '09 at 11:59
    
+1 for speed, my "best" of choice today :-) – paxdiablo Nov 8 '09 at 12:16
    
"Best" choice? Maybe that explains why I got 52 rep for this question... – Artelius Nov 9 '09 at 22:44

One way is to (may not be most efficient) convert it to a string and find the length of the string. Like:

int getDigits(int n)
{
    std::ostringstream stream;
    stream<<n;

    return stream.str().length();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this -- it's the simplest thing that you know will work. – Josh Lee Nov 8 '09 at 11:47
2  
@jleedev: ...slowly – Drew Hall Nov 8 '09 at 11:55
1  
That reminds me of if (boolVariable.toString().length() == 4)... – Pavel Shved Nov 8 '09 at 13:26
    
@pavel: I never claimed that its fast.. – Naveen Nov 8 '09 at 13:50
2  
Not only is this solution fine unless you need to compute a lot of these in a tight loop, it's the only one that was bug-free on the first try. There's something to be said about that. – Josh Lee Nov 8 '09 at 14:25

To extend Arteluis' answer, you could use templates to generate the comparisons:

template<int BASE, int EXP>
struct Power
{
    enum {RESULT = BASE * Power<BASE, EXP - 1>::RESULT};
};

template<int BASE>
struct Power<BASE, 0>
{
    enum {RESULT = 1};
};

template<int LOW = 0, int HIGH = 8>
struct NumDigits
{
    enum {MID = (LOW + HIGH + 1) / 2};

    inline static int calculate (int i)
    {
        if (i < Power<10, MID>::RESULT)
            return NumDigits<LOW, MID - 1>::calculate (i);
        else
            return NumDigits<MID, HIGH>::calculate (i);
    }
};

template<int LOW>
struct NumDigits<LOW, LOW>
{
    inline static int calculate (int i)
    {
        return LOW + 1;
    }
};

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
    // Example call.
    std::cout << NumDigits<>::calculate (1234567) << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Though I doubt it'll be worth the effort, +1 for a brilliant and borderline useful example of template metaprogramming! – Thomas Nov 8 '09 at 13:06
1  
OMG, my eyes are bleeding :-) – paxdiablo Nov 8 '09 at 13:08
    
It might seem a tad gratuitous, however i do think it brings the algorithm to the fore, unlike the nested comparisons. – jon-hanson Nov 8 '09 at 13:34
    
It would be much more useful if you cared to provide the entry point into this maze. In simple words: How do I use it now? I can figure it out, but for a less prepared reader it is simply useless for that reason alone. – AnT Nov 8 '09 at 17:44
    
@AndreyT: Fair enough. Done. – jon-hanson Nov 8 '09 at 19:41
numdigits = snprintf(NULL, 0, "%d", num);
share|improve this answer
    
Aren't you forgetting something... – Drew Hall Nov 8 '09 at 12:20
    
Ta - phone rang and I lost track of where I was. – Dipstick Nov 8 '09 at 12:23
int NumDigits(int n)
{
  int digits = 0;

  if (n < 0) {
    ++digits;
    do {
      ++digits;
      n /= 10;
    } while (n < 0);
  }
  else {
    do {
      ++digits;
      n /= 10;
    } while (n > 0);
  }

  return digits;
}

Edit: Corrected edge case behavior for -2^31 (etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
This erroneously returns 2 for -2147483648 – Josh Lee Nov 8 '09 at 11:39
    
@jleedev: Damn edge cases. Get a machine with 64 bit ints and all is well... :) – Drew Hall Nov 8 '09 at 11:40
    
int is typically 32 bits still. – Josh Lee Nov 8 '09 at 11:51
    
That's why I said 64 bit "ints" not "integers". Anyway, I fixed the code... – Drew Hall Nov 8 '09 at 11:52
    
That's good, because as long as we have twos-complement, that bug can still pop up places :) – Josh Lee Nov 8 '09 at 11:55

Some very over-complicated solutions have been proposed, including the accepted one.

Consider:

#include <cmath>
#include <cstdlib>

int NumDigits( int num )
{
    int digits = (int)log10( (double)abs(num) ) + 1 ;

    return num >= 0 ? digits : digits + 1 ;
}

Note that it works for for INT_MIN + 1 ... INT_MAX, because abs(INT_MIN) == INT_MAX + 1 == INT_MIN (due to wrap-around), which in-turn is invalid input to log10(). It is possible to add code for that one case.

share|improve this answer

Another implementation using STL binary search on a lookup table, which seems not bad (not too long and still faster than division methods). It also seem easy and efficient to adapt for type much bigger than int: will be faster than O(digits) methods and just needs multiplication (no division or log function for this hypothetical type). There is a requirement of a MAXVALUE, though. Unless you fill the table dynamically.

[edit: move the struct into the function]

int NumDigits9(int n) {
	struct power10{
		vector<int> data;
		power10() { 
			for(int i=10; i < MAX_INT/10; i *= 10) data.push_back(i);
		}
	};

	static const power10 p10;
	return 1 + upper_bound(p10.data.begin(), p10.data.end(), n) - p10.data.begin();
}
share|improve this answer

My version of loop (works with 0, negative and positive values):

int numDigits(int n)
{
   int digits = n<0;  //count "minus"
   do { digits++; } while (n/=10);
   return digits;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Counts the digits of negative numbers, but doesn't count the minus. The question (now) states that it should include the minus sign too. – Thomas Nov 8 '09 at 13:30
    
Very nice. The most elegant yet. I'd upvote, but it suffers from the same non-termination problem on unusual platforms as Thomas' answer. – avakar Nov 8 '09 at 14:10

If you're using a version of C++ which include C99 maths functions (C++0x and some earlier compilers)

static const double log10_2 = 3.32192809;

int count_digits ( int n )
{
    if ( n == 0 ) return 1;
    if ( n < 0 ) return ilogb ( -(double)n ) / log10_2 + 2;
    return ilogb ( n ) / log10_2 + 1;
}

Whether ilogb is faster than a loop will depend on the architecture, but it's useful enough for this kind of problem to have been added to the standard.

share|improve this answer
    
This crashes on -2147483648 – Josh Lee Nov 8 '09 at 14:25

An optimization of the previous division methods. (BTW they all test if n!=0, but most of the time n>=10 seems enough and spare one division which was more expensive).

I simply use multiplication and it seems to make it much faster (almost 4x here), at least on the 1..100000000 range. I am a bit surprised by such difference, so maybe this triggered some special compiler optimization or I missed something.

The initial change was simple, but unfortunately I needed to take care of a new overflow problem. It makes it less nice, but on my test case, the 10^6 trick more than compensates the cost of the added check. Obviously it depends on input distribution and you can also tweak this 10^6 value.

PS: Of course, this kind of optimization is just for fun :)

int NumDigits(int n) {
	int digits = 1;
	// reduce n to avoid overflow at the s*=10 step.
	// n/=10 was enough but we reuse this to optimize big numbers
	if (n >= 1000000) {
		n /= 1000000;
		digits += 6; // because 1000000 = 10^6
	}
	int s = 10;
	while (s <= n) {
		s *= 10;
		++digits;
	}
	return digits;
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a simpler version of Alink's answer .

int NumDigits(int n)
{
    if (n < 0)
        return NumDigits(-n) + 1;

    static int MaxTable[9] = { 10,100,1000,10000,100000,1000000,10000000,100000000,1000000000 };
    return 1 + (std::upper_bound(MaxTable, MaxTable+9, n) - MaxTable);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, it simplifies nicely small usual case like int. However, typing all these zeros seems error prone. I suggest using multiline to better show(and verify) the incrementation. – Alink Nov 14 '09 at 14:08

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