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Folks it is always said in TDD that

we should write junits even before we write the actual code.

Somehow I am not able to understand this in right spirit. I hope what it means is that you just write empty methods wih right signatures and your test case is expected to fail initially

Say in TDD approach i need to get the list of customers.

As per my understanding i will write the empty method like below

public List<CustomerData> getCustomers(int custId){

return null;
}

Now i will write junit test case where i will check the size as 10(that i am eactually expecting). Is this Right?

Basically my question is in TDD, How we can write junit test case before writing actual code?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I hope what it means is that you just write empty methods wih right signatures

Yes. And with most modern IDEs, if you write a method name which does not exist in your test, they will create a stub for you.

Say in TDD approach i need to get the list of customers. whats the right way to proceed?

Your example is not quite there. You want to test for a 0-length array, but you already return it: you should first return null, the test will obviously fail.

Then modify the method so that the test succeeds.

Then create a test method for customer add. Test fails. Fix it. Rinse. Repeat.

So, basically: with TDD, you start and write test that you KNOW will fail, and then fix your code so that they work.

Recommended read.

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My revised understanding with this is, say i am expecting 10 records in my database, then i would expect the test case to check for 10 size (now as soon as i implement my actual method, it should automatically fix the test case). Right? –  M Sach Jun 6 '13 at 11:57
    
Yes. One danger, of course, is to test for 2, 3, etc. You should test behaviour. Also, mocks will be of great help here. For instance, you can create a mock of your data class which returns 10 objects and test the behaviour of your class with that. By personal experience, I find that the more I use TDD (pretty much always now), the more I can design things easily, which is quite a bonus... –  fge Jun 6 '13 at 12:01
    
If this can help, at the moment, I write a simple class to test, commit here. After that, I'll test null values, then that the value is actually added. Right now, the only test fails. –  fge Jun 6 '13 at 12:11

Often you'll write the test alongside the skeleton of the code. Initially you can write a non-functional implementation (e.g. throw an UnsupportedOperationException) and that will trigger a test failure. Then you'd flesh out the implementation until finally your test passes.

You need to be pragmatic about this. Obviously you can't compile your test until at least your unit under test compiles, and so you have to do a minimal amount of implementation work alongside your test.

Check out this recent Dr Dobbs editoral, which discusses exactly this point and the role of pragmatism around this, especially by the mavens of this practise (Kent Beck et al)

A key principle of TDD is that you write no code without first writing a failing unit test. But in fact, if you talk to the principal advocates of TDD (such as Kent Beck, who popularized the technique, and Bob Martin, who has taught it to thousands of developers), you find that both of them write some code without writing tests first. They do not — I should emphasize this — view these moments as lapses of faith, but rather as the necessary pragmatism of the intelligent developer.

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As you said " if you talk to the principal advocates of TDD (such as Kent Beck, who popularized the technique, and Bob Martin, who has taught it to thousands of developers), you find that both of them write some code without writing tests first." could you direct meto examples where they wrote some code without writing tests first. Basically i want to know where to draw the line –  M Sach Jun 6 '13 at 12:00

That's partly right.

Using an IDE (Eclipse, IntelliJ) you can create a test. In that test invoke a method (that does not exist) and using a refactoring tool create a method with the proper signature.

That's a trick that makes working with TDD easier and more fun.

According to Now i will write junit test case where i will check the size as 0. Is this Right? you should write a test that fails, and the provide proper implementation.

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