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I have set up a base class as standard:

MyBase = function() {
    this.m_Stuff = 0; // etc
};
MyBase.prototype.MySuperFunction = function (arg1) {
    alert("Hello" + arg1);
};

Next I set up another class that inherits MyBase

MyChild = function () {
    MyBase.call(this);
    this.m_OtherStuff = 1; // etc
};
MyChild.prototype = new MyBase(); // innherit

But then (and this is the bit I dont know how to do) I want to override MyBase's MySuperFunction with a better one, but calling the base class function in the process:

MyChild.prototype.MySuperFunction = function (arg1, arg2) {
    MyBase.MySuperFunction(arg1); // THIS LINE IS THE LINE I DONT KNOW HOW TO DO
    alert("You is a " + arg2 + "'th level idiot");
};

Its a child class that wants to override is base class function, but wants to call the base class function in the new improved definition.

Is this possible, and if so, how can it be done?

share|improve this question
    
just to clarify, so are you saying MyBase.prototype.MySuperFunction needs to alert "You is a " + arg2 + "'th level idiot" or you are just trying to invoke it in the context of the child class method? – chrisvillanueva Jun 6 '13 at 13:23
    
I want my child class to call the base class' function before adding it's own amendment. – Rewind Jun 6 '13 at 14:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Please apply the following:-

MyBase.prototype.MySuperFunction.call(this, arg1);
share|improve this answer
    
So to clarify, you are saying my child's function will be MyChild.prototype.MySuperFunction = function (arg1, arg2) {MyBase.prototype.MySuperFunction.call(this, arg1); alert("You is a " + arg2 + "'th level idiot"); }; Also, when I set up an instance elsewhere; var mychild = new MyChild(); I would then call the CHILD'S version of the function with: mychild.MySuperFunction("Dave", "7"); – Rewind Jun 6 '13 at 14:07
    
yes, absolutely – pvnarula Jun 6 '13 at 14:08

It's similar to the call in your inherited constructor. You can access the "super" method still on MyBase.prototype.MySuperFunction (where you assigned it), so use:

MyBase.prototype.MySuperFunction.call(this, arg1);

For a more dynamic approach you even might use Object.getPrototypeOf to get the prototype, but watch out that it works with dynamic inheritance. And if you have many methods that need to call their parent, it can be helpful to alias MyBase.prototype as a super variable which is accessible to all functions on the Child prototype object (see this answer for an example)).

share|improve this answer
    
So to clarify, you are saying my child's function will be MyChild.prototype.MySuperFunction = function (arg1, arg2) {MyBase.prototype.MySuperFunction.call(this, arg1); alert("You is a " + arg2 + "'th level idiot"); }; – Rewind Jun 6 '13 at 14:06
    
@JonAshman: Yes, exactly. – Bergi Jun 6 '13 at 14:19
    
@Bergi is there a way to call this prototype thing within the original declaration of the function/object? this gist provides an example of what i'm talking about – abbood Apr 8 '14 at 10:48
    
No, prototype properties have to be declared outside the constructor function – Bergi Apr 8 '14 at 10:53
    
@Bergi!!!!!!!! that's incredibly ugly isn't it? I mean I would like to know that everything related to a defined "object" is encapsulated within those braces.. otherwise anyone can add all sortsa stuff anywhere within 100 js files in a large project.. is there a way to address this? – abbood Apr 8 '14 at 11:10

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