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I would like some help on this matter,

Example:

public class A {

    private void foo() {

          //Who Invoked me

    }

}

public class B extends A { }

public class C extends A { }

public class D {

     C.foo();

}

This is basically the scenario. My question is how can method foo() know who is calling it?

EDIT: Basically I am trying to do a database Layer, and in Class A I will create a method that will generate SQL statements. Such statements are dynamically generated by getting the values of all the public properties of the calling class.

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1  
Will this code even compile? –  Spoike Nov 8 '09 at 13:37
    
No, it won't compile. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 8 '09 at 13:48
3  
A method which changes it's behaviour based on the class of the caller really does turn object-oriented programming on it's head. How can you test such a class and have it behave the same in the test as in production? There's got to be a better way to implement what you're doing... –  daf Nov 8 '09 at 14:11
    
If this is for logging/debug, perhaps you should just use a debugger/tell users to learn a debugger rather than pollute your framework –  basszero Nov 8 '09 at 14:24
    
This reminds me somehow of the Fortran COME FROM statement fortran.com/come_from.html –  Jim Ferrans Nov 8 '09 at 14:30
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6 Answers 6

Perhaps for your use case it would make sense to pass the class of the caller into the method, like:

public class A { public void foo(Class<?> c) { ... } }

And call it something like this:

public class B { new A().foo(getClass() /* or: B.class */ ); }
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1  
+1 for +pointing out the right way to do it. Let's not mess up with stack traces for something like this. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 8 '09 at 13:54
2  
Yes. If caller must pursue the basic design which uses reflection to perform the task, let the linkage be clear. Pass the class, or an instance. –  CPerkins Nov 8 '09 at 14:02
    
In general I would agree with you, but if you are creating a framework of the sorts it can become useful –  mfeingold Nov 8 '09 at 14:15
1  
+1, the only reason to use a stack trace is in a debugging scenario. –  Yishai Nov 8 '09 at 14:43
1  
Why are you talking about a Class parameter anyway? He needs the Object of type D, so he can read the property values. I think Mark confused Class/Object anyway, or is everything static there? –  mhaller Nov 8 '09 at 15:16
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Easiest way is the following:

String className = new Exception().getStackTrace()[1].getClassName();

But in real there should be no need for this, unless for some logging purposes, because this is a fairly expensive task. What is it, the problem for which you think that this is the solution? We may come up with -much- better suggestions.

Edit: you commented as follows:

basically i'am trying to do a database Layer, and in Class A i will create a method that will generate sql statements, such statements are dynamically generated by getting the values of all the public properties of the calling class.

I then highly recommend to look for an existing ORM library, such as Hibernate, iBatis or any JPA implementation to your taste.

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basically i'am trying to do a database Layer, and in Class A i will create a method that will generate sql statements, such statements are dynamically generated by getting the values of all the public properties of the calling class. –  Mark Buhagiar Nov 8 '09 at 13:44
    
Do exceptions fill the stack trace in the constructor? Or only when thrown? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 8 '09 at 13:49
5  
@Mark: that's really bad design. I would deeply reconsider it. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 8 '09 at 13:50
2  
@Peter: Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[0].getMethodName() is always "getStackTrace". Guess you can figure out why... –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 8 '09 at 14:36
1  
@Mark, this gives you the NAME of the class but not the INSTANCE. In other words, WHICH object will you get the public fields from. You should pass in a data object. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 8 '09 at 14:45
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foo() is private, so the caller will always be in class A.

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Class D wouldn't have compiled. –  BalusC Nov 8 '09 at 13:44
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In .Net we can do it with StackTrace class. It gives you direct access to reflection info without any parsing. Is there anything similar in Java?

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Sure, read the earlier answers. –  Jim Ferrans Nov 8 '09 at 14:28
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May be the answer is here :

public class CallerMain {
public void foo(){
    System.out.println("CallerMain - foo");
    System.out.println(this.getClass());//output- callerMain
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    A a = new A();
    CallerMain cm = new CallerMain();
    cm.foo();

}

}

class A{
public void foo(){
    System.out.println("A - foo");
    System.out.println(this.getClass());//output- A
}
}
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