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How can I access an attribute from a css class by jquery?

I have a css class like:

.highlight { 
    color: red; 
}

And I need to do a color animation on an object:

$(this).animate({
    color: [color of highlight class]
}, 750);

So that I can change from 'red' to 'blue' (in the css) and my animation will works according my css.

An approach would be to place a invisible element with the 'highlight' class and then get the color of the element to use in the animation, but i guess this is a very very bad practice.

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Why not just use typical CSS to change color. CSS3 has animation ability. I would recommend checking into using CSS3 rather resorting to jQuery. –  Cam Jun 6 '13 at 15:03
1  
@Cam old browser support for one. Sadly, not everyone can ignore IE8. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 6 '13 at 15:03
1  
You can loop through the rules in the styles sheets. Crazy solution can be found here: stackoverflow.com/questions/324486/… The other solution is what you already suggested as long as there is not an !important somewhere else on a generic element selector. –  epascarello Jun 6 '13 at 15:04
    
Why can't you store the color in a variable in javascript? –  Tarun Pai Jun 6 '13 at 15:07
1  
I think creating an invisible element is probably your safest bet. If you only create one it's really not a big deal. Just remember that you need to create it, and then get the color, and then destroy it and not get the color from it every time since a call to $(".highlight").css would be able to override it otherwise. The only other solution would be to use a CSS parser, there are implementations, but limitations come with them since you'd need the actual CSS file in the same domain, and the flow would be crazy js->ajax to css->parse->get style. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 6 '13 at 15:10
show 5 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I wrote a small function that traverses the stylesheets on the document looking for the matched selector, then style.

There is one caveat, this will only work for style sheets defined with a style tag, or external sheets from the same domain.

If the sheet is known you can pass it in and save yourself from having to look in multiple sheets (faster and if you have colliding rules it's more exact).

I only tested on jsFiddle with some weak test cases, let me know if this works for you.

function getStyleRuleValue(style, selector, sheet) {
    var sheets = typeof sheet !== 'undefined' ? [sheet] : document.styleSheets;
    for (var i = 0, l = sheets.length; i < l; i++) {
        var sheet = sheets[i];
        if( !sheet.cssRules ) { continue; }
        for (var j = 0, k = sheet.cssRules.length; j < k; j++) {
            var rule = sheet.cssRules[j];
            if (rule.selectorText && rule.selectorText.split(',').indexOf(selector) !== -1) {
                return rule.style[style];
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}

example usage:

var color = getStyleRuleValue('color', '.foo'); // searches all sheets for the first .foo rule and returns the set color style.

var color = getStyleRuleValue('color', '.foo', document.styleSheets[2]); 

edit:

I neglected to take into consideration grouped rules. I changed the selector check to this:

if (rule.selectorText.split(',').indexOf(selector) !== -1) {

now it will check if any of the selectors in a grouped rules matches.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Very nice and done yourself. Also, note there is no jQuery dependency here so this can be used in any project! –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 6 '13 at 15:50
    
There were some issues when testing, should be all fixed now. Let me know if you find anything. –  rlemon Jun 6 '13 at 15:52
    
@rlemon at my fourth sheet, the sheet.cssRules is null, so 'sheet.cssRules.length' throw an error. I don't know why it is null, but you could check if is null before the second 'for' –  robsonrosa Jun 6 '13 at 16:10
1  
@robsonrosa I have two solutions that seem to work, let me test them and get back to you. –  rlemon Jun 6 '13 at 17:58
1  
@robsonrosa done and done. –  rlemon Jun 6 '13 at 18:29
show 9 more comments

Since you are already using jQuery try using the jQuery-ui's function switchClass which would allow you to animate to this new color.

For example:

 $('div').switchClass( "", "highlight", 1000 );

Demo


In case you do not want to include the whole UI library here is the code they use:

switchClass: function( remove, add, speed, easing, callback) {
    return $.effects.animateClass.call( this, {
        add: add,
        remove: remove
    }, speed, easing, callback );
}

And the animateClass fn:

var classAnimationActions = [ "add", "remove", "toggle" ],
    shorthandStyles = {
        border: 1,
        borderBottom: 1,
        borderColor: 1,
        borderLeft: 1,
        borderRight: 1,
        borderTop: 1,
        borderWidth: 1,
        margin: 1,
        padding: 1
    };
function styleDifference( oldStyle, newStyle ) {
    var diff = {},
        name, value;




    for ( name in newStyle ) {
        value = newStyle[ name ];
        if ( oldStyle[ name ] !== value ) {
            if ( !shorthandStyles[ name ] ) {
                if ( $.fx.step[ name ] || !isNaN( parseFloat( value ) ) ) {
                    diff[ name ] = value;
                }
            }
        }
    }




    return diff;
}
function getElementStyles( elem ) {
    var key, len,
        style = elem.ownerDocument.defaultView ?
            elem.ownerDocument.defaultView.getComputedStyle( elem, null ) :
            elem.currentStyle,
        styles = {};




    if ( style && style.length && style[ 0 ] && style[ style[ 0 ] ] ) {
        len = style.length;
        while ( len-- ) {
            key = style[ len ];
            if ( typeof style[ key ] === "string" ) {
                styles[ $.camelCase( key ) ] = style[ key ];
            }
        }
    // support: Opera, IE <9
    } else {
        for ( key in style ) {
            if ( typeof style[ key ] === "string" ) {
                styles[ key ] = style[ key ];
            }
        }
    }




    return styles;
}
$.effects.animateClass = function( value, duration, easing, callback ) {
    var o = $.speed( duration, easing, callback );

    return this.queue( function() {
        var animated = $( this ),
            baseClass = animated.attr( "class" ) || "",
            applyClassChange,
            allAnimations = o.children ? animated.find( "*" ).addBack() : animated;

        // map the animated objects to store the original styles.
        allAnimations = allAnimations.map(function() {
            var el = $( this );
            return {
                el: el,
                start: getElementStyles( this )
            };
        });

        // apply class change
        applyClassChange = function() {
            $.each( classAnimationActions, function(i, action) {
                if ( value[ action ] ) {
                    animated[ action + "Class" ]( value[ action ] );
                }
            });
        };
        applyClassChange();

        // map all animated objects again - calculate new styles and diff
        allAnimations = allAnimations.map(function() {
            this.end = getElementStyles( this.el[ 0 ] );
            this.diff = styleDifference( this.start, this.end );
            return this;
        });

        // apply original class
        animated.attr( "class", baseClass );

        // map all animated objects again - this time collecting a promise
        allAnimations = allAnimations.map(function() {
            var styleInfo = this,
                dfd = $.Deferred(),
                opts = $.extend({}, o, {
                    queue: false,
                    complete: function() {
                        dfd.resolve( styleInfo );
                    }
                });

            this.el.animate( this.diff, opts );
            return dfd.promise();
        });

        // once all animations have completed:
        $.when.apply( $, allAnimations.get() ).done(function() {

            // set the final class
            applyClassChange();

            // for each animated element,
            // clear all css properties that were animated
            $.each( arguments, function() {
                var el = this.el;
                $.each( this.diff, function(key) {
                    el.css( key, "" );
                });
            });

            // this is guarnteed to be there if you use jQuery.speed()
            // it also handles dequeuing the next anim...
            o.complete.call( animated[ 0 ] );
        });
    });
};

Working fiddle with all the functions that are needed: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/3C5ZQ/

share|improve this answer
    
This means including another huge external library (jQueryUI). –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 6 '13 at 15:28
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum you do not have to include the whole thing. You can just include this function from the jQuery ui's website. –  Neal Jun 6 '13 at 15:29
    
@Neal This can be a good solution (maybe the best solution) for me (I'm using jQueryUI), so thanks a lot, but I will not vote up (or 'accepted' it) because it don't answer the question. –  robsonrosa Jun 6 '13 at 15:38
    
@robsonrosa and why doesn't it answer the question? –  Neal Jun 6 '13 at 15:43
1  
@Neal sorry by my english. Your answer doesn't explain 'how to get a style attribute from a css class by jquery', but is excatly what i need. –  robsonrosa Jun 6 '13 at 15:49
show 2 more comments

How about this?

$('<span class="highlight"></span>').appendTo('body');
$(this).animate({
    color: $('.highlight').css('color')
}, 750);
$('.highlight').remove();

It's kind of dirty but will give you an (empty) element to reference to get the CSS value for which you are looking.

Update Here is a decent solution from CSS parser/abstracter? How to convert stylesheet into object

function findColorProperty(selector) {
    rules = document.styleSheets[0].cssRules
    for(i in rules) {
        //if(rules[i].selectorText==selector) 
            //return rules[i].cssText; // Original
        if(rules[i].selectorText == selector) 
            return rules[i].style.color; // Get color property specifically
    }
    return false;
}

Usage

$(this).animate({
    color: findColorProperty('.highlight')
}, 750);

Here is a fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/wzXDx/1/. I had to use styleSheets[1] to get this to work in the fiddle due to the embedded nature of the environment.

share|improve this answer
    
don't forget to remove the added span :-P –  Neal Jun 6 '13 at 15:24
1  
@BenjaminGruenbaum Updated to offer an actual solution. :) –  Joe Jun 6 '13 at 15:46
    
@Neal There you go. –  Joe Jun 6 '13 at 15:57
    
That is a bad idea Joe... then you remove all highlights on the page and not the just the one u created. –  Neal Jun 6 '13 at 15:58
    
@Neal I thought the idea was that no .highlight existed on the page. If it did, wouldn't the OP just use .css() instead of all of this stylesheet parsing madness? –  Joe Jun 6 '13 at 15:59
show 1 more comment

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