Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
myCoolObject {
  a: 0
  b: 12
  c: 24
}

I want to concatenate a, b and c so that they look like a unique string "a-b-c" (or "0-12-24" in the example).

a, b and c will always represent numbers. Converting each one of them from int to string require a lot of code: I'd just use sprintf() if I were in PHP or C, but how can I do this in JS without using toString() for each parameter and writing too much code?

Whole code:

var pickedDate = this.getSelectedDay().year.toString() + "-" + this.getSelectedDay().month.toString() + this.getSelectedDay().day.toString();

Seriously? Isn't there any more efficient way of doing this in js?

share|improve this question
    
Will the properties always be a, b and c or is there an arbitrary number of properties in each object? –  Mike Christensen Jun 6 '13 at 15:15
    
nope, same data structure all the times. –  Saturnix Jun 6 '13 at 15:15
    
Yea, I think what you have is probably the best way. You can perhaps create a toString prototype on whatever object holds this data. –  Mike Christensen Jun 6 '13 at 15:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
var myCoolString = myCoolObject.a + '-' + myCoolObject.b + '-' + myCoolObject.c;

See jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/ejDKg/

share|improve this answer
    
they're numbers: wouldn't js try to sum them? –  Saturnix Jun 6 '13 at 15:15
2  
@Saturnix Because there's a string being concatenated in between. If you just wanted to concatenate them (without characters in between), you could just use var str = "" + myCoolObject.a + myCoolObject.b + myCoolObject.c;. As soon as a string is encountered, concatenation will happen, not addition. If addition is needed, parentheses can be used –  Ian Jun 6 '13 at 15:15
    
oh, so no need to use toString() - I see now... thanks. –  Saturnix Jun 6 '13 at 15:16
    
I added a jsFiddle example to demonstrate. –  rink.attendant.6 Jun 6 '13 at 15:18
  1. Try sprintf() for JavaScript.

  2. Add new method to string

    if (!String.prototype.format) {
    String.prototype.format = function() {
       var args = arguments;
       return this.replace(/{(\d+)}/g, function(match, number) { 
          return typeof args[number] != 'undefined'
           ? args[number]
            : match
          ;
       });
      };
    }
    
    "{0} - {1} - {2}".format(myCoolObject.a, myCoolObject.b,myCoolObject.c)
    
share|improve this answer
1  
Please link to the original code instead of copypasting it. –  georg Jun 6 '13 at 15:34

Without much code it looks perfect here is the demo

myObj = {
  a: 0,
  b: 12,
  c: 24
}; 

var r="";

// iterate through all object properties
for (var p in myObj) 
{
    //concatenate it
    r+=myObj[p]+"-";
}

//remove the last dash
r=r.substring(0,r.length-1);

alert(r.substring(0,r.length-1));
share|improve this answer

This is mostly done with Array.join:

var pickedDate = [
    this.getSelectedDay().year, 
    this.getSelectedDay().month, 
    this.getSelectedDay().day
].join("-")

Although I personally prefer a small utility function similar to pythonic format():

format = function(fmt /*, args */) {
    var args = [].slice.call(arguments, 1);
    return fmt.replace(/{(\d+)}/g, function($0, $1) { 
        return String(args[$1])
    })
}

and then:

var pickedDate = format('{0}-{1}-{2}', 
    this.getSelectedDay().year, 
    this.getSelectedDay().month, 
    this.getSelectedDay().day)
share|improve this answer

how can I do this in JS without [...] writing too much code?

If you know all of your numbers are positive, you can write even less code to achieve the same as we know JavaScript executes left-to-right.

var obj = {a: 0, b: 12, c: 24}; /* define object
String + Number = String
                  String + Number = String
                                    String + Number = String
String + Number + Number + Number     = String    */
  ''   +  obj.a + -obj.b + -obj.c; // = "0-12-24"

The - were inserted because String + -Number = "String-Number", e.g.

'AK' + -47 // "AK-47"
share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter, please comment –  Paul S. Jun 6 '13 at 15:24
    
+1 I don't know why this has been downvoted - looks like a legit answer to me. –  Saturnix Jun 6 '13 at 15:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.