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I have this code right now, it fetches the date and time. I wanted to create kind of a numbered index because I get back about 10 date and times in that one foreach loop. It's in a function and I need to return this array to do something with it elsewhere.

$i = 0;
    foreach ($data as $key =>$value) {
        $new_data = array (
            $i => array (
                "date"=> $value->DATE,
                "time"=> $value->TIME,
            )
        );
        $i++;
    }

I wanted it to look more like this

Array (
    [0] => Array (
        [date] => whatever date
        [time] => whatever time
    )
    [1] => Array (
        [date] => whatever date
        [time] => whatever time
    )
    [2] .. etc
)

Turns out that's not what I'm getting. I get this.

Array (
        [10] => Array (
            [date] => whatever date
            [time] => whatever time
        )

It only prints out in one / just gives me the tenth. How would I get it to keep ++ing the $i variable to allow me to get it in the numbered indices? Why is it only showing me the tenth?

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1  
it could be a typo but you are missing a double quote after time "time => – Fabio Jun 6 '13 at 17:04
    
If you're not using $key, then omit it in the foreach statement foreach($data as $value) – reformed Jun 6 '13 at 17:15
    
Probably just a typo, as code clearly IS working (just not as expected); semicolons should've broke that, too. Edited both out. – raina77ow Jun 6 '13 at 17:15
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You probably wanted just this:

$new_data = array();
foreach ($data as $value) {
    $new_data[] = array (
        "date"=> $value->DATE;
        "time" => $value->TIME;
    );
}

First, without [], you just assign a new value to $new_data variable at each iteration. With it, you append a new element to an array at each step; that's obviously what should be done in this case.

Second, you don't have to use another variable in this case: indexing starts from 0, and with each new [] increases as it should be.

Finally (kudos to @reformed for mentioning that in comments), you don't have to write long form of foreach if you actually don't use array's keys. foreach $arr as $val is sufficient.


In my opinion, that may be rewritten more concise with array_map:

$new_data = array_map(function($val) { return array(
  'date' => $val->DATE,
  'time' => $val->TIME
); }, $data);

This function usually is quite a fit when one wants to create a normal array based on another array, and each element of this new array is somehow based on the corresponding element of the original collection.

I've used an anonymous function here as an argument of array_map, that's available since PHP 5.3.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, yes. Arrays get the best of me sometimes. – Jesse Samson Jun 6 '13 at 17:08
$i = 0;
foreach ($data as $key =>$value) {
    $new_data[$i++] = array (
            "date"=> $value->DATE;
            "time" => $value->TIME;
        )
    );
}
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