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I have a filter in Python3 that I am applying with a lambda function. Here is my function:

affy_reader = csv.DictReader(filter(lambda row:
                                    not row[0].startswith('#') and
                                    str(row[0]).isdigit(),
                                    file_pointer), 
                             delimiter='\t',
                             fieldnames=affy_column_headers)

Is there a way that I can print the value of row from within this lambda function? I think I need to do it like this because row is only scoped within the lambda. For example, were this a LISP Lambda procedure, I believe I could do something like this:

affy_reader = csv.DictReader(filter(lambda row: print(row) 
                                    not row[0].startswith('#') and
                                    str(row[0]).isdigit(),
                                    file_pointer), 
                             delimiter='\t',
                             fieldnames=affy_column_headers)

Because the print() is read and executed in-line. Is there some way in Python to do this? Or if not, what is a good way for me to see this value? Thanks!

*I realize my "LISP" example is Python not LISP. I was just trying to illustrate further what it is I am trying to do.

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Do you want to print all rows, or just those that pass the filter? –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 6 '13 at 18:08
    
I would like to print all rows I guess Tim. I am really just wanting to have a look at that row to make sure my lambda function is filtering out exactly what it needs to. I am leaning towards breaking it out into another function, as suggested... –  Houdini Jun 6 '13 at 18:15
1  
But then you should also add something to the output that tells you which line will be filtered and which one won't - right? –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 6 '13 at 18:16
    
To the output of the new function I create to replace this anonymous one you mean? –  Houdini Jun 6 '13 at 18:18
    
Check out my new edit. I hope that makes it clear what I mean. –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 6 '13 at 18:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think you can do it with a lambda. Just define a helper function. That way you can also display whether a certain row is or isn't going to be filtered:

def filter_plus_print(row):
    result = not row[0].startswith('#') and str(row[0]).isdigit()
    print("Keeping:" if result else "Removing:", row)
    return result

and then do

affy_reader = csv.DictReader(filter(filter_plus_print, file_pointer), 
                             delimiter='\t',
                             fieldnames=affy_column_headers)
share|improve this answer
    
If you are still around, I can run the code we talked about earlier, but the print statements inside of the filter_plus_print function do not seem to execute. i.e. I do not see the output in my console. Any idea as to why? –  Houdini Jun 6 '13 at 22:32
    
@Houdini: Hm. And apart from that, the program is working correctly? By the way, I just noticed that if str(row[0].isdigit()) is True, then row[0].startswith("#") must necessarily be false, so you can safely remove that condition. –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 7 '13 at 5:52

There is no pythonic way to execute multiple statements in an anonymous function. I would suggest breaking the lambda out to a named function, like so:

def relevant(row):
    print(row)
    return not row[0].startswith('#') and str(row[0]).isdigit()

affy_reader = csv.DictReader(filter(relevant, file_pointer), 
                             delimiter='\t',
                             fieldnames=affy_column_headers)
share|improve this answer
    
I did use this solution, the other guy just answered first and was a bit more descriptive. I upvoted ya though, thanks! –  Houdini Jun 6 '13 at 18:45

You can view the values within file_pointer by printing it directly.

print(file_pointer)
affy_reader = csv.DictReader(filter(lambda row:
                                    not row[0].startswith('#') and
                                    str(row[0]).isdigit(),
                                    file_pointer), 
                             delimiter='\t',
                             fieldnames=affy_column_headers)
share|improve this answer

The problems is that print(row) returns None and you have to do something with it. Rather unpleasant in most cases.

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