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I am making a log in and registration form. Since I am dealing with passwords, I want to do it right so excuse the long lines of code. I have manage to do the registration form that will hash the password. But My problem is when logging in the password is not reading it and I am using only one mock account and one password. Do you think its the hashing? Please help

PHP Code(I have made a functions.php file that has the functions needed to do this log in it contains)

login function

function login($email, $password, $mysqli) {
// Using prepared Statements means that SQL injection is not possible. 
if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT accountID, UserName, Password, salt FROM accounts     WHERE email = ? LIMIT 1")) { 
  $stmt->bind_param('s', $email); // Bind "$email" to parameter.
  $stmt->execute(); // Execute the prepared query.
  $stmt->store_result();
  $stmt->bind_result($user_id, $username, $db_password, $salt); // get variables from result.
  $stmt->fetch();
  $password = hash('sha512', $password.$salt); // hash the password with the unique salt.

  if($stmt->num_rows == 1) { // If the user exists
     // We check if the account is locked from too many login attempts
     if(checkbrute($user_id, $mysqli) == true) { 
        // Account is locked
        // Send an email to user saying their account is locked
        return false;
     } else {
     if($db_password == $password) { // Check if the password in the database matches the password the user submitted. 
        // Password is correct!


           $user_browser = $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']; // Get the user-agent string of the user.

           $user_id = preg_replace("/[^0-9]+/", "", $user_id); // XSS protection as we might print this value
           $_SESSION['user_id'] = $user_id; 
           $username = preg_replace("/[^a-zA-Z0-9_\-]+/", "", $username); // XSS protection as we might print this value
           $_SESSION['username'] = $username;
           $_SESSION['login_string'] = hash('sha512', $password.$user_browser);
           // Login successful.
           return true;    
     } else {
        // Password is not correct
        // We record this attempt in the database
        $now = time();
        $mysqli->query("INSERT INTO login_attempts (user_id, time) VALUES ('$user_id', '$now')");
        return false;
     }
  }
  } else {
     // No user exists. 
     return false;
  }
  }
  }

I have a checkbrute function that deals with forced logins

function checkbrute($user_id, $mysqli) {
   // Get timestamp of current time
   $now = time();
   // All login attempts are counted from the past 2 hours. 
   $valid_attempts = $now - (2 * 60 * 60); 

   if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT time FROM login_attempts WHERE user_id = ? AND time > '$valid_attempts'")) { 
      $stmt->bind_param('i', $user_id); 
      // Execute the prepared query.
      $stmt->execute();
      $stmt->store_result();
      // If there has been more than 5 failed logins
      if($stmt->num_rows > 5) {
         return true;
      } else {
         return false;
      }
   }
}

Finaly I have a login_check to check if all session variables are set

function login_check($mysqli) {
   // Check if all session variables are set
   if(isset($_SESSION['user_id'], $_SESSION['username'], $_SESSION['login_string'])) {
     $user_id = $_SESSION['user_id'];
     $login_string = $_SESSION['login_string'];
     $username = $_SESSION['username'];

     $user_browser = $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']; // Get the user-agent string of the user.

     if ($stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT Password FROM accounts WHERE accountID = ? LIMIT 1")) { 
        $stmt->bind_param('i', $user_id); // Bind "$user_id" to parameter.
        $stmt->execute(); // Execute the prepared query.
        $stmt->store_result();

        if($stmt->num_rows == 1) { // If the user exists
           $stmt->bind_result($password); // get variables from result.
           $stmt->fetch();
           $login_check = hash('sha512', $password.$user_browser);
           if($login_check == $login_string) {
              // Logged In!!!!
              return true;
           } else {
              // Not logged in
              return false;
           }
        } else {
            // Not logged in
            return false;
        }
     } else {
        // Not logged in
        return false;
     }
   } else {
     // Not logged in
     return false;
   }
}

I am running the login form via separate html file

<body>
<form action="process_login.php" method="post" name="login_form">
Email: <input type="text" name="email" value=""/>
Password: <input type="password" name="password" id="password" value="" />
<input type="button" value="Login" onclick="formhash(this.form, this.form.password);" />
</form>
</body>
</html>

and the Process_login.php

include 'db_connect.php';
include 'functions.php';
sec_session_start(); // Our custom secure way of starting a php session. 

if(isset($_POST['email'], $_POST['password'])) { 
   $email = $_POST['email'];
   $password = $_POST['password']; // The hashed password.
   if(login($email, $password, $mysqli) == true) {
      // Login success
      echo 'Success: You have been logged in!';

   } else {
      // Login failed
      echo 'Fail';

   }
} else { 
   // The correct POST variables were not sent to this page.
   echo 'Invalid Request';
}

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
What's your encryption method for the registration process? Whatever it is, it should be the same thing for the login process. Don't append strings that change (such as browsers)... otherwise users will be forced to use X browser to login. –  Half Crazed Jun 6 '13 at 18:33
1  
So your using the HTTP_USER_AGENT to salt the password? hash('sha512', $password.$user_browser); or is that a typo? –  AlexP Jun 6 '13 at 18:38
2  
Especially when dealing with security I'm a believer in trying not to reinvent the wheel. Maybe try this library: openwall.com/phpass. If it's good enough for WordPress, it's good enough for me. –  Dominic P Jun 6 '13 at 19:05
    
@DominicP Wordpress gets hacked all the time. That's like saying "If it's good enough for the government...". That framework is nice however. –  AbsoluteƵERØ Jun 6 '13 at 19:06
    
@AbsoluteZero, that's interesting I wasn't aware of any big security holes in WordPress. Even so, are you saying their password hashes are weak? –  Dominic P Jun 6 '13 at 19:09

2 Answers 2

Absolute ZERO is right, you are using random salts and you are comparing password hashes as a whole with each other, they will never match. I think you should be using bcrypt. In that you can create random and unique salts, but they crypt() function in that only checks for the part that was hashed and not the salts.

This is a more sensible way of doing it and you won't have to create a separate column for storing salts. Also bcrypt is probably the safest method hashing method available today, and it is really slow, which would only be a problem for attackers and not your users.

I don't know a tutorial that shows how to use bcrypt, but I'm sure u'll find tons when u search on Google. However, here is a very good tutorial on a Log in and registration system that also uses bcrypt(): http://www.sunnytuts.com/article/login-and-registration-with-object-oriented-php-and-pdo

I think you'll find it really useful, but make sure you continue to Part 2 of that tutorial.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer

You've got the right idea with the security, but if you're generating a new random salt on every attempt when you're trying to compare with an existing record it should never match (it's random)*. You have to store the salt in the table along with the salted hashed password. The salt should be random for each user (as in random, not their user agent), but you'll need to use the salt from the creation of the account to hash the user's password input for comparison.

To make the fix:

  1. You'll need to add a 'salt' column to your accounts table (or a relation table that you can relate to the accounts table).

  2. Once that's added then you would need to adjust any of the functions where you're doing an insert into the database with the user's information. You'll need to add salt='$salt' to the SQL.

  3. On the checks for input login_check() and login() you'll need to do the following:

Update the SQL for the query to check the username first:

"select count(*) from accounts where username = '$username'"

If the count is '1', then do this:

"select salt from accounts where username = '$username'"

Then you would do this:

$password_for_comparison = hash('sha512', $password.$salt_from_database);

Then you would do this:

"select count(*) from accounts where username='username' and password='$password_for_comparison'"

If this count is 1 then you have a valid user.

Those few things can be added into a new function and called in the other functions (so you're not maintaining two separate code sets).

*Note: There are cases where a collision may occur, but with your selection of sha512 this is such a random possibility it's unlikely without someone trying brute force the thing with something like hashcat on a box with 25 vid cards running opencl.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this now would I have to apply this to the functions login or the login_check? –  patgarci Jun 6 '13 at 19:37
    
It looks like you're replicating the functionality in both. I've updated my answer. –  AbsoluteƵERØ Jun 6 '13 at 19:47

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