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Hi I have a simple question

char *a="abc";
printf("%s\n",a);

int *b;
b=1;
printf("%d\n",b);

Why the first one works but the second one doesnot work? I think the first one should be

char *a="abc";
printf("%s\n",*a);

I think a stores the address of "abc". So why it shows abc when i print a? I think I should print *a to get the value of it.

Thanks

Ying

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2  
I'm sure this is a dupe (probably many times over), but regardless, you should read c-faq.com/charstring/index.html. –  Carl Norum Jun 6 '13 at 18:29
    
Also, have you read the printf man page? It describes exactly what is required and how to use it. –  Carl Norum Jun 6 '13 at 18:30
3  
Please try compiling with warnings enabled. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 6 '13 at 18:31
    
can you reference a the address 1 like ..its not a correct addres..whereas "abc" returns the address where "abc" is stored –  sethi Jun 6 '13 at 18:32
1  
Most printf format specifiers use the value of the corresponding argument. %s is unusual in that it uses what the argument points to. –  Keith Thompson Jun 6 '13 at 19:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why the first one works but the second one doesnot work?

Because in the first, you're not asking it to print a character, you're asking it to print a null-terminated array of characters as a string.

The confusion here is that you're thinking of strings as a "native type" in the same way as integers and characters. C doesn't work that way; a string is just a pointer to a bunch of characters ending with a null byte.

If you really want to think of strings as a native type (keeping in mind that they really aren't), think of it this way: the type of a string is char *, not char. So, printf("%s\n", a); works because you're passing a char * to match with a format specifier indicating char *. To get the equivalent problems as with the second example, you'd need to pass a pointer to a string—that is, a char **.

Alternatively, the equivalent of %d is not %s, but %c, which prints a single character. To use it, you do have to pass it a character. printf("%c\n", a) will have the same problem as printf("%d\n", b).


From your comment:

I think a stores the address of "abc". So why it shows abc when i print a? I think I should print *a to get the value of it.

This is where the loose thinking of strings as native objects falls down.

When you write this:

char *a = "abc";

What happens is that the compiler stores a array of four characters—'a', 'b', 'c', and '\0'—somewhere, and a points at the first one, the a. As long as you remember that "abc" is really an array of four separate characters, it makes sense to think of a as a pointer to that thing (at least if you understand how arrays and pointer arithmetic work in C). But if you forget that, if you think a is pointing at a single address that holds a single object "abc", it will confuse you.


Quoting from the GNU printf man page (because the C standard isn't linkable):

d, i

The int argument is converted to signed decimal notation …

c

… the int argument is converted to an unsigned char, and the resulting character is written…

s

… The const char * argument is expected to be a pointer to an array of character type (pointer to a string). Characters from the array are written up to (but not including) a terminating null byte ('\0') …


One last thing:

You may be wondering how printf("%s", a) or strchr(a, 'b') or any other function can print or search the string when there is no such value as "the string".

They're using a convention: they take a pointer to a character, and print or search every character from there up to the first null. For example, you could write a print_string function like this:

void print_string(char *string) {
    while (*string) {
        printf("%c", *string);
        ++string;
    }
}

Or:

void print_string(char *string) {
    for (int i=0; string[i]; ++i) {
        printf("%c", string[i]);
    }
}

Either way, you're assuming the char * is a pointer to the start of an array of characters, instead of just to a single character, and printing each character in the array until you hit a null character. That's the "null-terminated string" convention that's baked into functions like printf, strstr, etc. throughout the standard library.

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Is this correct? WHEN USING CHAR POINTERS P = ENTIRE STRING &P = ADDRESS OF THE POINTER *P = 1RST BLOCK OF THE STRING *(P + 2) = 3RD BLOCK OF THE STRING WHEN USING INT POINTERS P = ADDRESS OF THE CONTENTS P IS POINTING TO &P = ADDRESS OF THE POINTER ITSELF (INT *P's ADDRESS) *P = CONTENTS OF THE POINTER (1 BLOCK OF MEMORY) –  saul203 Jun 6 '13 at 18:51
    
Between the capital letters and the lack of formatting, that's very hard to read—but even once I get past that, I don't understand what your question is. But if you're writing P = "abcd";, then P is a pointer to the initial 'a', which by convention some functions will use as a pointer to a string of characters starting with that 'a' and ending with the first null character (after the 'd'). –  abarnert Jun 6 '13 at 18:57
    
So, *P is 'a', &P is a pointer to a pointer to that 'a', P+2 is a pointer to the 'c' (which can be passed to string functions, which will treat it as the string "cd"), *(P+2) is 'c'. –  abarnert Jun 6 '13 at 18:58
    
Thanks but I mean if char *p="abcd" then print p i can get "abcd". but what about printing *p? –  saul203 Jun 6 '13 at 19:03
    
and when I print p with %c. I get a "?". I dont konw how does this happen –  saul203 Jun 6 '13 at 19:07

Strings aren't really "first-class citizens" in C. In reality, they're just implemented as null-terminated arrays of characters, with some syntactic sugar thrown in to make programmers' lives easier. That means when passing strings around, you'll mostly be doing it via char * variables - that is, pointers to null-terminated arrays of char.

This practice holds for calling printf, too. The %s format is matched with a char * parameter to print the string - just as you've seen. You could use *a, but you'd want to match that with a %c or an integer format to print just the single character pointed to.

Your second example is wrong for a couple of reasons. First, it's not legal to make the assignment b = 1 without an explicit cast in C - you'd need b = (int *)1. Second, you're trying to print out a pointer, but you're using %d as a format string. That's wrong too - you should use %p like this: printf("%p\n", (void *)b);.

What it really looks like you're trying to do in the second example is:

int b = 1;
int *p = &b;
printf("%d\n", *p);

That is, make a pointer to an integer, then dereference it and print it out.

Editorial note: You should get a good beginner C book (search around here and I'm sure you'll find suggestions) and work through it.

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So is this correct? –  saul203 Jun 6 '13 at 18:46
    
WHEN USING CHAR POINTERS P = ENTIRE STRING &P = ADDRESS OF THE POINTER *P = 1RST BLOCK OF THE STRING *(P + 2) = 3RD BLOCK OF THE STRING WHEN USING INT POINTERS P = ADDRESS OF THE CONTENTS P IS POINTING TO &P = ADDRESS OF THE POINTER ITSELF (INT *P's ADDRESS) *P = CONTENTS OF THE POINTER (1 BLOCK OF MEMORY) –  saul203 Jun 6 '13 at 18:46
    
Holy crap that's a lot of capital letters. I'm not really sure what you're asking. Did you read the FAQ link I posted in a comment above? What do you mean by 'block' in this context? Are you trying to say 'byte'? –  Carl Norum Jun 6 '13 at 18:50
    
I know the solution about the int pointer. So for the char pointer of a. What is stored in *a and what is stored in a? I think *a should store the "abc"; –  saul203 Jun 6 '13 at 18:54
    
@saul203: You've told the compiler that a is a char *—a pointer to a character. So, *a has to be a character. And it is; it's 'a'. The reason printf can print abc instead of just a is that it follows the null-terminated string convention: to print a %s, it prints the character at a, then the character at a+1, and so on, stopping as soon as it finds a null character. –  abarnert Jun 6 '13 at 19:00

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