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I need to find unique rows in a numpy.array.

For example:

>>> a # I have
array([[1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]])
>>> new_a # I want to get to
array([[1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]])

I know that i can create a set and loop over the array, but I am looking for an efficient pure numpy solution. I believe that there is a way to set data type to void and then I could just use numpy.unique, but I couldn't figure out how to make it work.

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3  
pandas has a dataframe.drop_duplicates() method. See stackoverflow.com/questions/12322779/pandas-unique-dataframe and pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/generated/… –  codeape Jun 6 '13 at 19:55
    
Thank you, but I cannot use pandas. –  Akavall Jun 6 '13 at 19:56
2  
possible duplicate of Removing duplicates in each row of a numpy array –  Andy Hayden Jun 6 '13 at 20:00
    
How about stackoverflow.com/a/8567929/3571 ? –  codeape Jun 6 '13 at 20:08
    
@Andy Hayden, despite the title, it is not a duplicate to this question. codeape's link is a duplicate though. –  Wai Yip Tung Nov 23 '13 at 6:21

8 Answers 8

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Another option to the use of structured arrays is using a view of a void type that joins the whole row into a single item:

a = np.array([[1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
              [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]])

b = np.ascontiguousarray(a).view(np.dtype((np.void, a.dtype.itemsize * a.shape[1])))
_, idx = np.unique(b, return_index=True)

unique_a = a[idx]

>>> unique_a
array([[0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]])

EDIT Added np.ascontiguousarray following @seberg's recommendation. This will slow the method down if the array is not already contiguous.

EDIT The above can be slightly sped up, perhaps at the cost of clarity, by doing:

unique_a = np.unique(b).view(a.dtype).reshape(-1, a.shape[1])

Also, at least on my system, performance wise it is on par, or even better, than the lexsort method:

a = np.random.randint(2, size=(10000, 6))

%timeit np.unique(a.view(np.dtype((np.void, a.dtype.itemsize*a.shape[1])))).view(a.dtype).reshape(-1, a.shape[1])
100 loops, best of 3: 3.17 ms per loop

%timeit ind = np.lexsort(a.T); a[np.concatenate(([True],np.any(a[ind[1:]]!=a[ind[:-1]],axis=1)))]
100 loops, best of 3: 5.93 ms per loop

a = np.random.randint(2, size=(10000, 100))

%timeit np.unique(a.view(np.dtype((np.void, a.dtype.itemsize*a.shape[1])))).view(a.dtype).reshape(-1, a.shape[1])
10 loops, best of 3: 29.9 ms per loop

%timeit ind = np.lexsort(a.T); a[np.concatenate(([True],np.any(a[ind[1:]]!=a[ind[:-1]],axis=1)))]
10 loops, best of 3: 116 ms per loop
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. This is the answer that I was looking for, can you explain what is going on in this step: b = a.view(np.dtype((np.void, a.dtype.itemsize * a.shape[1]))) ? –  Akavall Jun 7 '13 at 0:28
1  
@Akavall It is creating a view of your data with a np.void data type of size the number of bytes in a full row. It´s similar two what you get if you have an array of np.uint8s and view it as np.uint16s, which combines every two columns into a single one, but more flexible. –  Jaime Jun 7 '13 at 2:34
3  
@Jaime, can you add a np.ascontiguousarray or similar to be generally safe (I know it is a bit more restrictive then necessary, but...). The rows must be contiguous for view to work as expected. –  seberg Jun 7 '13 at 10:04
2  
@ConstantineEvans It is a recent addition: in numpy 1.6, trying to run np.unique on an array of np.void returns an error related to mergesort not being implemented for that type. It works fine in 1.7 though. –  Jaime Jun 7 '13 at 20:01
2  
It's worth noting that if this method is used for floating point numbers there's a catch that -0. will not compare as equal to +0., whereas an element-by-element comparison would have -0.==+0. (as specified by the ieee float standard). See stackoverflow.com/questions/26782038/… –  tom10 Nov 6 '14 at 23:52

If you want to avoid the memory expense of converting to a series of tuples or another similar data structure, you can exploit numpy's structured arrays.

The trick is to view your original array as a structured array where each item corresponds to a row of the original array. This doesn't make a copy, and is quite efficient.

As a quick example:

import numpy as np

data = np.array([[1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                 [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
                 [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
                 [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]])

ncols = data.shape[1]
dtype = data.dtype.descr * ncols
struct = data.view(dtype)

uniq = np.unique(struct)
uniq = uniq.view(data.dtype).reshape(-1, ncols)
print uniq

To understand what's going on, have a look at the intermediary results.

Once we view things as a structured array, each element in the array is a row in your original array. (Basically, it's a similar data structure to a list of tuples.)

In [71]: struct
Out[71]:
array([[(1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0)],
       [(0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0)],
       [(0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0)],
       [(1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0)],
       [(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0)]],
      dtype=[('f0', '<i8'), ('f1', '<i8'), ('f2', '<i8'), ('f3', '<i8'), ('f4', '<i8'), ('f5', '<i8')])

In [72]: struct[0]
Out[72]:
array([(1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0)],
      dtype=[('f0', '<i8'), ('f1', '<i8'), ('f2', '<i8'), ('f3', '<i8'), ('f4', '<i8'), ('f5', '<i8')])

Once we run numpy.unique, we'll get a structured array back:

In [73]: np.unique(struct)
Out[73]:
array([(0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0), (1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0), (1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0)],
      dtype=[('f0', '<i8'), ('f1', '<i8'), ('f2', '<i8'), ('f3', '<i8'), ('f4', '<i8'), ('f5', '<i8')])

That we then need to view as a "normal" array (_ stores the result of the last calculation in ipython, which is why you're seeing _.view...):

In [74]: _.view(data.dtype)
Out[74]: array([0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0])

And then reshape back into a 2D array (-1 is a placeholder that tells numpy to calculate the correct number of rows, give the number of columns):

In [75]: _.reshape(-1, ncols)
Out[75]:
array([[0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]])

Obviously, if you wanted to be more concise, you could write it as:

import numpy as np

def unique_rows(data):
    uniq = np.unique(data.view(data.dtype.descr * data.shape[1]))
    return uniq.view(data.dtype).reshape(-1, data.shape[1])

data = np.array([[1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                 [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
                 [0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
                 [1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0],
                 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]])
print unique_rows(data)

Which results in:

[[0 1 1 1 0 0]
 [1 1 1 0 0 0]
 [1 1 1 1 1 0]]
share|improve this answer
    
This actually seems very slow, almost as slow as using tuples. Sorting a structured array like this is slow, apparently. –  cge Jun 6 '13 at 20:28
    
@cge - Try it with larger-sized arrays. Yes, sorting a numpy array is slower than sorting a list. Speed isn't the main consideration in most cases where you're using ndarrays, though. It's memory usage. A list of tuples will use vastly more memory than this solution. Even if you have enough memory, with a reasonably large array, converting it to a list of tuples has greater overhead than the speed advantage. –  Joe Kington Jun 6 '13 at 20:34
    
@cge - Ah, I didn't notice you were using lexsort. I thought you were referring to using a list of tuples. Yeah, lexsort is probably the better option in this case. I'd forgotten about it, and jumped to an overly complex solution. –  Joe Kington Jun 6 '13 at 20:37

np.unique works by sorting a flattened array, then looking at whether each item is equal to the previous. This can be done manually without flattening:

ind = np.lexsort(a.T)
a[ind[np.concatenate(([True],np.any(a[ind[1:]]!=a[ind[:-1]],axis=1)))]]

This method does not use tuples, and should be much faster and simpler than other methods given here.

NOTE: A previous version of this did not have the ind right after a[, which mean that the wrong indices were used. Also, Joe Kington makes a good point that this does make a variety of intermediate copies. The following method makes fewer, by making a sorted copy and then using views of it:

b = a[np.lexsort(a.T)]
b[np.concatenate(([True], np.any(b[1:] != b[:-1],axis=1)))]

This is faster and uses less memory.

Also, if you want to find unique rows in an ndarray regardless of how many dimensions are in the array, the following will work:

b = a[lexsort(a.reshape((a.shape[0],-1)).T)];
b[np.concatenate(([True], np.any(b[1:]!=b[:-1],axis=tuple(range(1,a.ndim)))))]

An interesting remaining issue would be if you wanted to sort/unique along an arbitrary axis of an arbitrary-dimension array, something that would be more difficult.

Edit:

To demonstrate the speed differences, I ran a few tests in ipython of the three different methods described in the answers. With your exact a, there isn't too much of a difference, though this version is a bit faster:

In [87]: %timeit unique(a.view(dtype)).view('<i8')
10000 loops, best of 3: 48.4 us per loop

In [88]: %timeit ind = np.lexsort(a.T); a[np.concatenate(([True], np.any(a[ind[1:]]!= a[ind[:-1]], axis=1)))]
10000 loops, best of 3: 37.6 us per loop

In [89]: %timeit b = [tuple(row) for row in a]; np.unique(b)
10000 loops, best of 3: 41.6 us per loop

With a larger a, however, this version ends up being much, much faster:

In [96]: a = np.random.randint(0,2,size=(10000,6))

In [97]: %timeit unique(a.view(dtype)).view('<i8')
10 loops, best of 3: 24.4 ms per loop

In [98]: %timeit b = [tuple(row) for row in a]; np.unique(b)
10 loops, best of 3: 28.2 ms per loop

In [99]: %timeit ind = np.lexsort(a.T); a[np.concatenate(([True],np.any(a[ind[1:]]!= a[ind[:-1]],axis=1)))]
100 loops, best of 3: 3.25 ms per loop
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice! On a side note, though, it does make several intermediary copies. (e.g. a[ind[1:]] is a copy, etc) On the other hand, your solution is generally 2-3x faster than mine up until you run out of ram. –  Joe Kington Jun 6 '13 at 20:55
    
Good point. As it turns out, my attempt to take out intermediary copies by using just the indexes made my method use more memory and end up slower than just making a sorted copy of the array, as a_sorted[1:] isn't a copy of a_sorted. –  cge Jun 6 '13 at 21:16
    
What is dtype in your timings? I think you got that one wrong. On my system, calling np.unique as described in my answer is slightly faster than using either of your two flavors of np.lexsort. And it is about 5x faster if the array to find uniques has shape (10000, 100). Even if you decide to reimplement what np.unique does to trim some (minor) execution time, collapsing every row into a single object runs faster comparisons than having to call np.any on the comparison of the columns, especially for higher column counts. –  Jaime Jun 7 '13 at 9:55
    
@cge: you probably meant 'np.any' instead of standard 'any' wich does not take keyword argument. –  Alfred M. Sep 12 '13 at 10:59

np.unique when I run it on np.random.random(100).reshape(10,10) returns all the unique individual elements, but you want the unique rows, so first you need to put them into tuples:

array = #your numpy array of lists
new_array = [tuple(row) for row in array]
uniques = np.unique(new_array)

That is the only way I see you changing the types to do what you want, and I am not sure if the list iteration to change to tuples is okay with your "not looping through"

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3  
+1 This is clear, short and pythonic. Unless speed is a real issue, these type of solutions should take preference over the complex, higher voted answers to this question IMO. –  Bill Cheatham Apr 30 '14 at 13:36
    
I prefer this over the accepted solution. Speed isn't an issue for me because I only have perhaps < 100 rows per invocation. This precisely describes how performing unique over rows is performed. –  rayryeng Apr 1 at 17:04
    
This actually does not work for my data, uniques contains unique elements. Potentially I misunderstand the expected shape of array - could you be more precise here? –  FooBar Apr 20 at 13:34

Yet another possible solution

np.vstack({tuple(row) for row in a})
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3  
+1 This is clear, short and pythonic. Unless speed is a real issue, these type of solutions should take preference over the complex, higher voted answers to this question IMO. –  Bill Cheatham Apr 30 '14 at 13:36

Here is another variation for @Greg pythonic answer

np.vstack(set(map(tuple, a)))
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Based on the answer in this page I have written a function that replicates the capability of MATLAB's unique(input,'rows') function, with the additional feature to accept tolerance for checking the uniqueness. It also returns the indices such that c = data[ia,:] and data = c[ic,:]. Please report if you see any discrepancies or errors.

def unique_rows(data, prec=5):
    import numpy as np
    d_r = np.fix(data * 10 ** prec) / 10 ** prec + 0.0
    b = np.ascontiguousarray(d_r).view(np.dtype((np.void, d_r.dtype.itemsize * d_r.shape[1])))
    _, ia = np.unique(b, return_index=True)
    _, ic = np.unique(b, return_inverse=True)
    return np.unique(b).view(d_r.dtype).reshape(-1, d_r.shape[1]), ia, ic
share|improve this answer

np.unique works given a list of tuples:

>>> np.unique([(1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3), (4, 4), (2, 2)])
Out[9]: 
array([[1, 1],
       [2, 2],
       [3, 3],
       [4, 4]])

With a list of lists it raises a TypeError: unhashable type: 'list'

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