Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the appropriate way to clear a slice in Go?

Here's what I've found in the go forums:

// test.go
package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    letters := []string{"a", "b", "c", "d"}
    fmt.Println(cap(letters))
    fmt.Println(len(letters))
    // clear the slice
    letters = letters[:0]
    fmt.Println(cap(letters))
    fmt.Println(len(letters))
}

Is this correct?

Edit: Let me clarify, the buffer is cleared so it can be reused.

An example is Buffer.Truncate function in the bytes package.

Notice that Reset just calls Truncate(0). So it appears that in this case line 70 would evaluate: b.buf = b.buf[0 : 0]

http://golang.org/src/pkg/bytes/buffer.go

// Truncate discards all but the first n unread bytes from the buffer.
60  // It panics if n is negative or greater than the length of the buffer.
61  func (b *Buffer) Truncate(n int) {
62      b.lastRead = opInvalid
63      switch {
64      case n < 0 || n > b.Len():
65          panic("bytes.Buffer: truncation out of range")
66      case n == 0:
67          // Reuse buffer space.
68          b.off = 0
69      }
70      b.buf = b.buf[0 : b.off+n]
71  }
72  
73  // Reset resets the buffer so it has no content.
74  // b.Reset() is the same as b.Truncate(0).
75  func (b *Buffer) Reset() { b.Truncate(0) }
share|improve this question
    
A quick test on: play.golang.org/p/6Z-qDQtpbg seems to suggest that it will work (won't change the capacity but it will truncate the length) –  Jason Sperske Jun 6 '13 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It all depends on what is your definition of 'clear'. One of the valid ones certainly is:

slice = slice[:0]

But there's a catch. If slice elements are of type T:

var slice []T

then enforcing len(slice) to be zero, by the above "trick", doesn't make any element of

slice[:cap(slice)]

eligible for garbage collection. This might be the optimal approach in some scenarios. But it might also be a cause of "memory leaks" - memory not used, but potentially reachable (after re-slicing of 'slice') and thus not garbage "collectable".

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Is there any other way to remove all elements from the underlying array of the slice while leaving the underlying capacity unchanged? –  Chris Weber Jun 6 '13 at 21:07
1  
@ChrisWeber: just iterate over the underlying array and set all the elements to a new value –  newacct Jun 7 '13 at 14:02
    
@newacct, thanks, I was guessing that. –  Chris Weber Jun 7 '13 at 15:18
    
@jnml, I do want to reuse the slice (and the underlying array storage) so I'm not constantly allocating a new slice (with array). I've edited my question to clarify and to show some example code from the standard library. –  Chris Weber Jun 7 '13 at 15:19

I think that setting the slice to nil is the best way of emptying a slice. nil slices in go are perfectly well behaved and setting the slice to nil will release the underlying memory to the garbage collector.

See playground

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func dump(letters []string) {
    fmt.Println("letters = ", letters)
    fmt.Println(cap(letters))
    fmt.Println(len(letters))
    for i := range letters {
        fmt.Println(i, letters[i])
    }
}

func main() {
    letters := []string{"a", "b", "c", "d"}
    dump(letters)
    // clear the slice
    letters = nil
    dump(letters)
    // add stuff back to it
    letters = append(letters, "e")
    dump(letters)
}

Prints

letters =  [a b c d]
4
4
0 a
1 b
2 c
3 d
letters =  []
0
0
letters =  [e]
1
1
0 e

Note that slices can easily be aliased so that two slices point to the same underlying memory. The setting to nil will remove that aliasing.

This method changes the capacity to zero though.

share|improve this answer
    
Nick thanks of the response. Please see my update it you would. I'm clearing the slice for reuse. So I don't necessarily want that the underlying memory released to the GC as I'll just have to allocate it again. –  Chris Weber Jun 7 '13 at 15:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.