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I was wondering how I bind to the ith element of a list I am using for itemscontrol.

My code looks like this:

<ItemsControl x:Name ="Signalviewer_Control" ItemsSource="{Binding Source = {StaticResource signal_data}, Path = list_of_signals}">
  <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
    <DataTemplate>
      <wpfExp:SignalViewer Signal={StaticResource signal_data}, Path=list_of_signals[i]/>
    </DataTemplate>
  </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
</ItemsControl>

Needless to say I don't think list_of_signals[i] is valid syntax. But basically what i want to do is make itemscontrol create its default stackpanel in which each item from the list creates a new signalviewer. I then want to bind the created signalviewer's dependency property that I made to the signaldata in the static resource. However, I do not know how to access the specific signal that corresponds to the ith signalviewer.

Thanks for any help.

edit: Maybe it has to be done in code behind? I just wanted to know whether it was possible using just xaml though.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The DataContext for each UI item in the ItemsControl will automatically be assigned to the corresponding Data Item in the source Collection. Therefore this is valid and will work:

<ItemsControl x:Name ="Signalviewer_Control" ItemsSource="{Binding Source = {StaticResource signal_data}, Path = list_of_signals}">
  <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
    <DataTemplate>
      <wpfExp:SignalViewer Signal="{Binding}"/>
    </DataTemplate>
  </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
</ItemsControl>
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I wanted to ask one more question. In my situation, is it more logical for me to just create a custom control that inherits from itemscontrol? –  James Joshua Street Jun 6 '13 at 21:01
    
@JamesJoshuaStreet No. subclassing WPF controls is usually a bad idea unless you have all the right reasons (such as a custom UI functionality that cannot be achieved by any standard WPF means). For example, a Circular Panel. Subclassing controls just to set some properties (or to change appearance as you would do in ancient traditional frameworks) makes no sense at all and reduces maintainability. –  HighCore Jun 6 '13 at 21:03

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