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I made a simple app that goes through all lines of a large (1.5MB) text file and displays each line that contains a specific word (the word is received from the user via an EditText). The app definitely puts my device under a lot of strain while it's searching through the text file but I had never received a single ANR prompt until I added the code below. Now I receive the ANR prompts often. Removing the code from the app gets rid of the ANR prompts. What is it about this code that could be causing the prompts? Is it written incorrectly? Aside from causing the ANR prompts, it's working properly.

editText1.setOnKeyListener(new EditText.OnKeyListener() 
{
   public boolean onKey(View v, int keyCode, KeyEvent event)
   {
      if ((event.getAction() == KeyEvent.ACTION_DOWN) && (keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_ENTER))
      {
      button1.performClick();
      return true;
      }
   return false;
   }
});

EDIT:

It appears the ANR prompt was a result of the OnKeyListener process not being able to complete within a few seconds of being triggered via an Enter key press. It wasn't able to complete because it launched a time-consuming resource-hogging process that delayed its completion. The solution was to just have the OnKeyListener process change the value of a variable, instead of launching the resource-hogging process. This allows the OnKeyListener process to complete right away, then the resource-hogging process is launched from elsewhere (triggered by change in the variable's value).

Below, is the code I'm now using. At a later date, I'll try making a second app that puts the resource-hogging process in the background as recommended by Simon André Forsberg below.

   final Handler mHandler = new Handler();
   new Thread(new Runnable()
   {
   @Override
   public void run()
   {
      while (true) 
      {
         try 
         {
         mHandler.post(new Runnable() {
         @Override
            public void run()
            {
               if (NeedToClickButton == 1)
               {
               NeedToClickButton = 0
               button1.performClick();
               }
            }   
         });
      } catch (Exception e) {
   }}}}).start();



editText1.setOnKeyListener(new EditText.OnKeyListener() 
{
   public boolean onKey(View v, int keyCode, KeyEvent event)
   {
      if ((event.getAction() == KeyEvent.ACTION_DOWN) && (keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_ENTER))
      {
      NeedToClickButton = 1;
      return true;
      }
   return false;
   }
});
share|improve this question
1  
Just a side note, according to the java naming conventions, variable names (such as MyEditText and MyButton) should start with a lowercase letter. Right now, to most java developers on the first look of your code MyEditText and MyButton sounds like a class name considering the uppercase starting letter. –  Simon André Forsberg Jun 6 '13 at 20:48
    
I believe the call of setOnKeyListener is not what is causing your application to stop responding, but rather what you are actually doing in the click of "MyButton". However, if you believe that the code in your question is what is causing the problem I think you should check how often it is called (add Log.i("Calling perform click"); before the line "MyButton.performClick();") –  Simon André Forsberg Jun 6 '13 at 20:51
    
@Simon André Forsberg I'll edit it real quick to prevent confusion. –  Eric Glass Jun 6 '13 at 20:52
    
@Simon André Forsberg: It shouldn't be clicking the button unless I press the Enter key (unless it's written incorrectly of course) ... I'll try to figure out how to do the Log.i thing you recommended. –  Eric Glass Jun 6 '13 at 20:56
    
using Log.i is just one way of providing info/debug to the log. To view the log you have to see the logcat, it can be viewed directly within Eclipse or it can also be used by using the adb command. See developer.android.com/tools/help/logcat.html –  Simon André Forsberg Jun 6 '13 at 20:59

1 Answer 1

You should be performing such long operations in an AsyncTask

Here's an example of how I would have done it:

class ScanTextTask extends AsyncTask<String, Void, List<String>> {
     protected List<String> doInBackground(String... param) {
         // load file from the string param[0]
         // add all the results to a list and return the list
     }

     protected void onPostExecute(List<String> result) {
         // add the result to the UI of your choice
     }
 }

And then, to start the task you use: new ScanTextTask().execute(filename);

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I'll be sure to try that next time. For now I just need to figure out how having this OnKeyListener code sitting in my app is causing ANR prompts. –  Eric Glass Jun 6 '13 at 21:02
    
@EricGlass what happens if you click the button directly, without using the down key method? Does not the ANR happen then as well? I believe switching to an AsyncTask will solve the ANR prompt, as it will perform the operation in the background without blocking the UI-thread. –  Simon André Forsberg Jun 6 '13 at 21:05
    
Clicking the button (manually or via the Enter key press) does not cause the ANR prompt. The prompt just appears after the app has been searching through the text file for about 4 seconds. If I remove this OnKeyListener code, I get no ANR prompts, even if the app sits there searching for 20 seconds. I will definitely be trying the AsyncTask option in the near future but I've still got to know how adding this bit of of seemingly harmless code is managing to cause ANR prompts to appear when they didn't appear at all before. –  Eric Glass Jun 6 '13 at 21:24
    
@EricGlass A non-responsive app for 20 seconds is still a problem, even if you don't get an ANR prompt. I believe the reason could be that your code is wanting to be executed twice when you use the key listener, but the second time cannot be executed because the first one is not finished and therefore an ANR prompt appears because your app is simply too busy to respond to code wanting to be executed. You should really use AsyncTasks as soon as possible. It will solve all your problems for now. –  Simon André Forsberg Jun 6 '13 at 21:33
    
Scratch that. I misread what you said. Pressing the Enter key instead of pressing the on-screen button manually does appear to be what starts the problem. Glad you asked that question. Now we're getting somewhere. –  Eric Glass Jun 6 '13 at 21:34

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