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I want to write a code in python to solve a sudoku puzzle. Do you guys have any idea about a good algorithm for this purpose. I read somewhere in net about a algorithm which solves it by filling the whole box with all possible numbers, then inserts known values into the corresponding boxes.From the row and coloumn of known values the known value is removed.If you guys know any better algorithm than this please help me to write one. Also I am confused that how i should read the known values from the user. It is really hard to enter the values one by one through console. Any easy way for this other than using gui?

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1  
If you type "Python Sudoku" in the search box, it might give you a starting point. – Mathias Nov 8 '09 at 18:01
3  
    
Have a look at: norvig.com/sudoku.html This is one of the most often sited pages on solving sudoku, using Python /M – MartinHvidberg Nov 25 '15 at 16:35

I wrote a simple program that solved the easy ones. It took its input from a file which was just a matrix with spaces and numbers. The datastructure to solve it was just a 9 by 9 matrix of a bit mask. The bit mask would specify which numbers were still possible on a certain position. Filling in the numbers from the file would reduce the numbers in all rows/columns next to each known location. When that is done you keep iterating over the matrix and reducing possible numbers. If each location has only one option left you're done. But there are some sudokus that need more work. For these ones you can just use brute force: try all remaining possible combinations until you find one that works.

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i didnt get what you meant by bit mask. – ragsagar Nov 9 '09 at 5:35
    
You use a 16-bit integer where the lower 9 bits specify which of the values are still possible. So '1 is still possible' is specified by the rightmost bit, '2 is still possible' is specified by the second rightmost bit, etc. You can OR these values together and thereby specify a complete state of a location in the sudoku matrix. For example 000001111 means that only 1, 2, 3 and 4 are still possible, the rest is ruled out already by the values of other locations in the matrix. Does that make it more clear? – Sebastiaan M Nov 9 '09 at 14:08
    
Is there any advantage to using the bit mask, than storing the actual possible values like '1234' ? Thanks. – antew Jan 8 at 17:27
    
A minor one is storage, but for such a small problem that is not an issue. The main reason for me was performance. It's faster to check if bit x is set than to try to find character 'x' in a string. – Sebastiaan M Jan 9 at 5:30

Here is my sudoku solver in python. It uses simple backtracking algorithm to solve the puzzle. For simplicity no input validations or fancy output is done. Its the bare minimum code which solves the problem.

Algorithm

  1. Find all legal values of a given cell
  2. For each legal value, Go recursively and try to solve the grid

Solution

It takes 9X9 grid partially filled with numbers. A cell with value 0 indicates that it is not filled.

Code



    def findNextCellToFill(grid, i, j):
            for x in range(i,9):
                    for y in range(j,9):
                            if grid[x][y] == 0:
                                    return x,y
            for x in range(0,9):
                    for y in range(0,9):
                            if grid[x][y] == 0:
                                    return x,y
            return -1,-1

    def isValid(grid, i, j, e):
            rowOk = all([e != grid[i][x] for x in range(9)])
            if rowOk:
                    columnOk = all([e != grid[x][j] for x in range(9)])
                    if columnOk:
                            # finding the top left x,y co-ordinates of the section containing the i,j cell
                            secTopX, secTopY = 3 *(i/3), 3 *(j/3)
                            for x in range(secTopX, secTopX+3):
                                    for y in range(secTopY, secTopY+3):
                                            if grid[x][y] == e:
                                                    return False
                            return True
            return False

    def solveSudoku(grid, i=0, j=0):
            i,j = findNextCellToFill(grid, i, j)
            if i == -1:
                    return True
            for e in range(1,10):
                    if isValid(grid,i,j,e):
                            grid[i][j] = e
                            if solveSudoku(grid, i, j):
                                    return True
                            # Undo the current cell for backtracking
                            grid[i][j] = 0
            return False


Testing the code


>>> input = [[5,1,7,6,0,0,0,3,4],[2,8,9,0,0,4,0,0,0],[3,4,6,2,0,5,0,9,0],[6,0,2,0,0,0,0,1,0],[0,3,8,0,0,6,0,4,7],[0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],[0,9,0,0,0,0,0,7,8],[7,0,3,4,0,0,5,6,0],[0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]]
>>> solveSudoku(input)
True
>>> input
[[5, 1, 7, 6, 9, 8, 2, 3, 4], [2, 8, 9, 1, 3, 4, 7, 5, 6], [3, 4, 6, 2, 7, 5, 8, 9, 1], [6, 7, 2, 8, 4, 9, 3, 1, 5], [1, 3, 8, 5, 2, 6, 9, 4, 7], [9, 5, 4, 7, 1, 3, 6, 8, 2], [4, 9, 5, 3, 6, 2, 1, 7, 8], [7, 2, 3, 4, 8, 1, 5, 6, 9], [8, 6, 1, 9, 5, 7, 4, 2, 3]]


The above one is very basic backtracking algorithm which is explained at many places. But the most interesting and natural of the sudoku solving strategies I came across is this one from here

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Not gonna write full code, but I did a sudoku solver a long time ago. I found that it didn't always solve it (the thing people do when they have a newspaper is incomplete!), but now think I know how to do it.

  • Setup: for each square, have a set of flags for each number showing the allowed numbers.
  • Crossing out: just like when people on the train are solving it on paper, you can iteratively cross out known numbers. Any square left with just one number will trigger another crossing out. This will either result in solving the whole puzzle, or it will run out of triggers. This is where I stalled last time.
  • Permutations: there's only 9! = 362880 ways to arrange 9 numbers, easily precomputed on a modern system. All of the rows, columns, and 3x3 squares must be one of these permutations. Once you have a bunch of numbers in there, you can do what you did with the crossing out. For each row/column/3x3, you can cross out 1/9 of the 9! permutations if you have one number, 1/(8*9) if you have 2, and so forth.
  • Cross permutations: Now you have a bunch of rows and columns with sets of potential permutations. But there's another constraint: once you set a row, the columns and 3x3s are vastly reduced in what they might be. You can do a tree search from here to find a solution.
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Here is a much faster solution based on hari's answer. The basic difference is that we keep a set of possible values for cells that don't have a value assigned. So when we try a new value, we only try valid values and we also propagate what this choice means for the rest of the sudoku. In the propagation step, we remove from the set of valid values for each cell the values that already appear in the row, column, or the same block. If only one number is left in the set, we know that the position (cell) has to have that value.

This method is known as forward checking and look ahead (http://ktiml.mff.cuni.cz/~bartak/constraints/propagation.html).

The implementation below needs one iteration (calls of solve) while hari's implementation needs 487. Of course my code is a bit longer. The propagate method is also not optimal.

import sys
from copy import deepcopy

def output(a):
    sys.stdout.write(str(a))

N = 9

field = [[5,1,7,6,0,0,0,3,4],
         [2,8,9,0,0,4,0,0,0],
         [3,4,6,2,0,5,0,9,0],
         [6,0,2,0,0,0,0,1,0],
         [0,3,8,0,0,6,0,4,7],
         [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0],
         [0,9,0,0,0,0,0,7,8],
         [7,0,3,4,0,0,5,6,0],
         [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]]

def print_field(field):
    for i in range(N):
        for j in range(N):
            cell = field[i][j]
            if cell == 0 or isinstance(cell, set):
                output('.')
            else:
                output(cell)
            if (j + 1) % 3 == 0 and j < 8:
                output(' |')

            if j != 8:
                output(' ')
        output('\n')
        if (i + 1) % 3 == 0 and i < 8:
            output("- - - + - - - + - - -\n")

def read(field):
    """ Read field into state (replace 0 with set of possible values) """

    state = deepcopy(field)
    for i in range(N):
        for j in range(N):
            cell = state[i][j]
            if cell == 0:
                state[i][j] = set(range(1,10))

    return state

state = read(field)


def done(state):
    """ Are we done? """

    for row in state:
        for cell in row:
            if isinstance(cell, set):
                return False
    return True


def propagate_step(state):
    """ Propagate one step """

    new_units = False

    for i in range(N):
        row = state[i]
        values = set([x for x in row if not isinstance(x, set)])
        for j in range(N):
            if isinstance(state[i][j], set):
                state[i][j] -= values
                if len(state[i][j]) == 1:
                    state[i][j] = state[i][j].pop()
                    new_units = True
                elif len(state[i][j]) == 0:
                    return False, None

    for j in range(N):
        column = [state[x][j] for x in range(N)]
        values = set([x for x in column if not isinstance(x, set)])
        for i in range(N):
            if isinstance(state[i][j], set):
                state[i][j] -= values
                if len(state[i][j]) == 1:
                    state[i][j] = state[i][j].pop()
                    new_units = True
                elif len(state[i][j]) == 0:
                    return False, None

    for x in range(3):
        for y in range(3):
            values = set()
            for i in range(3*x, 3*x+3):
                for j in range(3*y, 3*y+3):
                    cell = state[i][j]
                    if not isinstance(cell, set):
                        values.add(cell)
            for i in range(3*x, 3*x+3):
                for j in range(3*y, 3*y+3):
                    if isinstance(state[i][j], set):
                        state[i][j] -= values
                        if len(state[i][j]) == 1:
                            state[i][j] = state[i][j].pop()
                            new_units = True
                        elif len(state[i][j]) == 0:
                            return False, None

    return True, new_units

def propagate(state):
    """ Propagate until we reach a fixpoint """
    while True:
        solvable, new_unit = propagate_step(state)
        if not solvable:
            return False
        if not new_unit:
            return True


def solve(state):
    """ Solve sudoku """

    solvable = propagate(state)

    if not solvable:
        return None

    if done(state):
        return state

    for i in range(N):
        for j in range(N):
            cell = state[i][j]
            if isinstance(cell, set):
                for value in cell:
                    new_state = deepcopy(state)
                    new_state[i][j] = value
                    solved = solve(new_state)
                    if solved is not None:
                        return solved
                return None

print_field(solve(state))
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