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I am trying to run something like this from a bash script:

HOST=foo
DIR=bar

ssh user@$HOST "
function test
{
    CURHOST=$HOST
    cd $DIR
    mkdir -p $CURHOST
}; test"

When I run it with set -x I see that it translates to this:

+ ssh user@foo '
   function test
   {
       CURHOST=foo
       cd bar
       mkdir -p
   }; test

and then of course it complains about mkdir -p having no argument. Why is this and how can I set a local variable in there?

share|improve this question
    
I recommend to use a here document instead of the multiline string, that is ssh user@$HOST <<EOF\nfunction test\n...\nEOF. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jun 7 '13 at 9:06
    
Also you can use local for variables local to a function. And finally, even though you can declare a function using function test it is more common to use test() instead. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jun 7 '13 at 9:12

2 Answers 2

To prevent substitution, you can use either single-quotes '...' or a backslash \; for example, this command:

echo '$foo' \$foo "\$foo"

will print this:

$foo $foo $foo

and will not use the variable foo.

In your case, rather than using "..." for the whole argument, you probably should use '...' everywhere except where you specifically need substitution. So:

HOST=foo
DIR=bar

ssh user@$HOST '
function test
{
    CURHOST='"$HOST"'
    cd $DIR
    mkdir -p $CURHOST
}; test'
share|improve this answer

Just escape the dollar sign:

echo "
function test
{
    CURHOST=$HOST
    cd $DIR
    mkdir -p \$CURHOST
}; test"

gives you:

function test
{
    CURHOST=foo
    cd bar
    mkdir -p $CURHOST
}; test
share|improve this answer

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