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The behavior of sys.exc_info() is described in python docs and on SO and SO as:

  • within an except block or methods called by an except block, a triple describing the exception
  • elsewhere, a triple of None values

So why does this nosetest fail?

def test_lang_stack(self):
    try:
        self.assertEquals((None,None,None), sys.exc_info()) # no exception
        a = 5 / 0
    except:
        self.assertNotEquals((None,None,None), sys.exc_info())  # got exception
    else:
        self.fail('should not get here')
    #finally:
    #    self.assertEquals((None,None,None), sys.exc_info()) # already handled, right?
    self.assertEquals((None,None,None), sys.exc_info())  # already handled, right?

It fails at the last line. If you uncomment the finally block, it fails there instead.

I do see that if I put all this inside one method and call from a different method, then the calling method does not see the exception. The exc_info value seems to remain set to the end of the method where an exception is thrown, even after the exception is handled.

I'm using python2.7 on OSX.

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1 Answer 1

In both assertEquals() and assertNotEquals() you need to call:

sys.exc_clear()

This will clear things for the next error.

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I can manually clear the error like this, but the point is that the exc_info() call should distinguish between a context where I am handling an exception (in an except: block) vs a context where that exception is not being handled (everywhere else). I wouldn't want to have to explicitly add exc_clear() after every try/except statement throughout our project! –  user634943 Jun 7 '13 at 16:09
    
I think the design is to only use sys.exc_info() in exception blocks. –  cforbish Jun 10 '13 at 9:21
    
I agree with @user634943 that it would be great to have a way for exc_info() to return (None,None,None) if called outside of an except block. Unfortunately that does not happen magically and currently we do need to call exc_clear() manually... –  snooze92 Sep 22 '14 at 10:13
    
Or @cforbish, is there a way to ask python whether a piece of code was code within an except block? –  snooze92 Sep 22 '14 at 10:13

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