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How can I allocate dynamic memory for the 2D Array in the constructor but at the same time keep my std::unique_ptr handling its deallocation? Or is there a better way to do this?

My error is "Height is not a constant expression".

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <memory>

template<typename T>
class Matrix
{
    private:
        int Width, Height;
        std::unique_ptr<T*> Elements;

    public:
        Matrix(int Width, int Height);

        T* operator[](int Index);
        const T* operator[](int Index) const;
};

template<typename T>
Matrix<T>::Matrix(int Width, int Height) : Width(Width), Height(Height), Elements(new T[Width][Height]) {}

template<typename T>
T* Matrix<T>::operator[](int Index) {return Elements[Index];}


int main()
{
    Matrix<int> M(4, 4);
    std::cout << M[2][2];
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

function arguments cannot be used to initialize C array since their values are not necessarily known at compile time. Also a matrix class that does dynamic allocation like yours is not a good idea... I would recommend making the dimension part of your matrix class template, something like this

template<typename T, size_t Width, size_t Height>
class Matrix
{
    private:
        std::array<std::array<T, Height>, Width> Elements;

    public:
        Matrix() {}

        std::array<T, Height> & operator[](int Index) { return Elements[Index]; }
};

all the data are on the stack so you don't need to worry about destruction. I use std::array here but in real code a Vector class is usually used.

use typedef for commonly used matrix type

typedef Matrix<float, 2, 2> Mat2x2;
typedef Matrix<float, 3, 3> Mat3x3;
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Yeah but vector keeps track of each row and thus allows weird matrices if the user decides to resize one row and leave the others.. so I used plain arrays :D –  Brandon Jun 7 '13 at 1:41

You'll need to use a dynamic array idiom. Allocate a one-dimensional vector and translate the coordinates. Something like: , Elements( new T[Width*Height] ). Then you'll need to do array translation in your operator[], something like this: return Elements.get()+Index*Height;

Incidentally, your unique_ptr should be unique_ptr<T[]> rather than T*. If you allocate using new[], you need a unique_ptr<...[]> to ensure it's reclaimed using delete[].

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