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We are planning to use Hazelcast for queueing Apache Camel messages plus as a secondary Hibernate cache.

Assuming we configure our queue to use Integer.MAX_VALUE (which will probably not fit into memory) without a backing map: What will happen, if all memory is being used? I can't really find anything concerning this scenario in the documentation.

<hazelcast>
...
<queue name="tasks">
    <!--
        Maximum size of the queue. When a JVM's local queue size reaches the maximum,
        all put/offer operations will get blocked until the queue size
        of the JVM goes down below the maximum.
        Any integer between 0 and Integer.MAX_VALUE. 0 means Integer.MAX_VALUE. Default is 0.
    -->
    <max-size-per-jvm>0</max-size-per-jvm>

    <!--
        Name of the map configuration that will be used for the backing distributed
        map for this queue.
    -->
    <backing-map-ref></backing-map-ref>
</queue>

Same thing with maps: What happens if there's no TTL and the eviction policy is set to NONE, so the whole map won't fit into memory sooner or later?

<hazelcast>
...
<map name="default">
    <!--
        Number of backups. If 1 is set as the backup-count for example,
        then all entries of the map will be copied to another JVM for
        fail-safety. Valid numbers are 0 (no backup), 1, 2, 3.
    -->
    <backup-count>1</backup-count>

    <!--
        Maximum number of seconds for each entry to stay in the map. Entries that are
        older than <time-to-live-seconds> and not updated for <time-to-live-seconds>
        will get automatically evicted from the map.
        Any integer between 0 and Integer.MAX_VALUE. 0 means infinite. Default is 0.
    -->
    <time-to-live-seconds>0</time-to-live-seconds>

    <!--
        Maximum number of seconds for each entry to stay idle in the map. Entries that are
        idle(not touched) for more than <max-idle-seconds> will get
        automatically evicted from the map.
        Entry is touched if get, put or containsKey is called.
        Any integer between 0 and Integer.MAX_VALUE.
        0 means infinite. Default is 0.
    -->
    <max-idle-seconds>0</max-idle-seconds>

    <!--
        Valid values are:
        NONE (no extra eviction, <time-to-live-seconds> may still apply),
        LRU  (Least Recently Used),
        LFU  (Least Frequently Used).
        NONE is the default.
        Regardless of the eviction policy used, <time-to-live-seconds> will still apply. 
    -->
    <eviction-policy>NONE</eviction-policy>

    <!--
        Maximum size of the map. When max size is reached,
        map is evicted based on the policy defined.
        Any integer between 0 and Integer.MAX_VALUE. 0 means
        Integer.MAX_VALUE. Default is 0.
    -->
    <max-size policy="cluster_wide_map_size">0</max-size>

    <!--
        When max. size is reached, specified percentage of
        the map will be evicted. Any integer between 0 and 100.
        If 25 is set for example, 25% of the entries will
        get evicted.
    -->
    <eviction-percentage>25</eviction-percentage>
   <!--
        Specifies when eviction will be started. Default value is 3. 
       So every 3 (+up to 5 for performance reasons) seconds 
       eviction will be kicked of. Eviction is costly operation, setting 
       this number too low, can decrease the performance. 
   -->
  <eviction-delay-seconds>3</eviction-delay-seconds>
</map>
</hazelcast>

While this is a rather stupid configuration, this is just an example for the situation when you run out of memory.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the case of a queue, if you cannot consume as fast as you produce then eventually you can go out of memory, meaning JVM will throw OutOfMemoryException as you try to create new objects. It is usually a good practice to have a max size for the queue, if it is every possible to have a backlog.

Same for the map that you can run out of memory, if you try to insert too many entries into a map.

Question is similar to "I have a local java.util.HashMap, what happens if I try to insert 1 billion entries into it? what will happen if all memory is being used". So not really that specific to Hazelcast. Let me know if I am missing anything in the question.

-talip

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I guess it would be useful to know the nature of the failure. Does it block, or return immediately with failure? Are there other operations that could be useful, such as tryPut() ? –  vikingsteve Jun 24 '13 at 12:05

By default Hazelcast immediately terminates the node that runs out of memory. See DefaultOutOfMemoryHandler.

If you wish to change default behaviour you can implement an OutOfMemoryHandler

public class MyOutOfMemoryHandler extends OutOfMemoryHandler {

     public void onOutOfMemory(OutOfMemoryError oom, HazelcastInstance[] instances) {
        // handle oom
    }
}

and register it through

Hazelcast.setOutOfMemoryHandler(new MyOutOfMemoryHandler());

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