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I think the title says it all, I'm looking for a one-liner to remove lines of a file in which a specific character, let's say /, appears more than x times - 5, for instance.

Start:

/Bo/byl/apointe

S/ta/ck/ov/er/flo/w

M/oon/

Expected result:

/Bo/byl/apointe

M/oon/

Thank you for your suggestions !

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With problems like this, try not to think of what you want to REMOVE from a file, but instead about what you want to SELECT from a file so you don't fall into the trap of coming up with a solution that employs negative (or double-negative!) logic. In this case you simply want to select lines that have less than 6 "/"s. –  Ed Morton Jun 7 '13 at 13:45
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use gsub function of awk. gsub return number of successful substitution made. So you can use that as reference to identify number of occurrences of particular character.

awk 'gsub(/\//,"&")<5' file

Updated Based on Ed Morton's suggestion.

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Thanks Jaypal, it works ! –  bobylapointe Jun 7 '13 at 1:31
    
@bobylapointe Great. Glad I could help! –  jaypal Jun 7 '13 at 1:43
1  
That is so far away from the right approach.... Even IF it was necessary or useful to do the gsub(), which it isn't, there's no need to save the entire file contents in an array and print them later, all you'd do is awk 'gsub(/\//,"&")<5' file. –  Ed Morton Jun 7 '13 at 13:48
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@EdMorton Thanks for the suggestion. Looks like I have a lot to learn. I have updated the answer with your suggestion (hope that's ok). –  jaypal Jun 7 '13 at 14:14
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 's|/|&|5;T;d' file
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All you need is:

awk -F/ 'NF<6' file

Look:

$ cat file
/Bo/byl/apointe
S/ta/ck/ov/er/flo/w
M/oon/

$ awk -F/ 'NF<6' file
/Bo/byl/apointe
M/oon/
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+1 I'm always trying to find complicated solution to simple problem. –  jaypal Jun 7 '13 at 14:16
    
@Jaypal the solution usually comes from the way you think about the requirements. The poster said he wanted to remove lines based on some criteria but that's NOT what he wants output, that's the process he was thinking of adopting to get what he wanted output. What he ACTUALLY wanted output was a file where every line has less than 6 "/"s. If he'd simply said that then the solution is obvious. –  Ed Morton Jun 7 '13 at 15:41
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I couldn't agree more. Thanks for leaving great feedback. Someday I'll get there! :) –  jaypal Jun 7 '13 at 15:46
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I believe sed would be sufficient here. You'll want to look into //d and supply the correct condition. I'm going to try something and update when I have better ideas, you should too :)

Once you find it sed -i /{blah}/d will be enough to change it in the file, but you might want to run it without the -i and pipe it through less first to confirm it's doing what you think it's doing.

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This would do :

sed -r '/(\/.*){5}\//d' file
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Since the question is tagged grep:

grep -vE '(/[^/]*){5,}' inputfile

If your version of grep doesn't support extended RE:

grep -v '\(/[^/]*\)\{5,\}' inputfile
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