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I am trying to create a script to pull out an account code from a file. The file itself is long and contains a lot of other data, but I have included below an excerpt of the part I am looking at (there is other contents before and after this excerpt)

The section of the file I am interested in sometimes look like this

  Account       Customer Order No.          Whse         Payment Terms          Stock No.          Original Invoice No.
                                                                                                       VIN No.
 AAAAAA01             9999                  1000             30 days

and sometimes it looks like this

  Account       Customer Order No.          Whse         Payment Terms          Stock No.          Original Invoice No.
 AAAAAA01             9999                  1000             30 days

(one field cut off the end, where that field had been wrapping down onto it's own line)

I know I can use | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -F 1 to pull the code once I have the line it is on, but that is not a set line number (the content before this section is dynamic).

I am starting by trying to handled the case with the extra field, I figure it will be easy enough to make that an optional match with ?

The number of spaces used to separate the fields can change as this is essentially OCRed.

A few of my attempts so far - (assume the file is coming in from STDIN)

| sed -n '/\s*Account\s\+Customer Order No\.\s\+Whse\s\+Payment Terms\s\+Stock No\.\s\+Original Invoice No\.\s\+VIN No\.\s*/{n;p;}'
| sed -n '/\s*Account\s\+Customer Order No\.\s\+Whse\s\+Payment Terms\s\+Stock No\.\s\+Original Invoice No\.\s*\n\s*VIN No\.\s*/{n;p;}'
| sed -n '/\s*Account\s\+Customer Order No\.\s\+Whse\s\+Payment Terms\s\+Stock No\.\s\+Original Invoice No\.\s*\r\s*VIN No\.\s*/{n;p;}'
| sed -n '/\s*Account\s\+Customer Order No\.\s\+Whse\s\+Payment Terms\s\+Stock No\.\s\+Original Invoice No\.\s*\r\n\s*VIN No\.\s*/{n;p;}'

These all failed to match whatsoever

| sed -n '/\s*Account\s\+Customer Order No\.\s\+Whse\s\+Payment Terms\s\+Stock No\.\s\+Original Invoice No\.\s*/,/\s\*VIN No\.\s*/{n;p;}'

This at least matched something, but frustratingly printed the VIN No. line, followed by every second line after it. It also seems like it would be more difficult to mark as an optional part of the expression.

So, given an input of the full file (including either of the above excerpts), I am looking for an output of either

AAAAAA01             9999                  1000             30 days

(which I can then trim to the required data) or AAAAAA01 if there is an easier way of getting straight to that.

share|improve this question
    
What is the output you're trying to get? It's not clear from all your attempts. –  Barmar Jun 7 '13 at 2:33
    
Does it have to be done with sed? awk would be much easier for this. –  Barmar Jun 7 '13 at 2:34
    
The intended output is the line "AAAAAA01 9999 1000 30 days" - whether the input includes the extra line and VIN No. part or not –  Chris O'Kelly Jun 10 '13 at 22:55
    
And to the close voter - care to comment as to why? is this question a duplicate (I'd love to see the question it's a duplicate of, it might be exactly what I need!)? Is it low quality (if there is something I can do to increase it's quality, and, as such, increase it's likelihood of getting an answer, it's in my best interest)? Is it off topic? Seems to me that if you vote to close but are not interested in improving the question, you are not using the system for what it is meant for. –  Chris O'Kelly Jun 10 '13 at 22:58
    
@Barmar I am not hard set on a tool, sed is just what I had used for similar tasks up to this point –  Chris O'Kelly Jun 10 '13 at 23:10
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -n '/Account/{n;/VIN No\./n;p}' file

Use sed with the -n switch, this makes sed act like grep i.e. only print lines explicitly using the commands P or (this case) p.

  • /Account/ match a line with the pattern Account
  • For the above match only:
  • n normally this would print the current line and then read the next line into the pattern space, but as the -n is in action no printing takes place. So now the pattern space contains the next line.
  • /VIN No\./n If the current line contains Vin No effectively empty the pattern space and read in the next line.
  • p print whatever is currently in the pattern space.

So this a condition within a condition. When we encounter Action print either the following line or the line following that.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @potong, could you explain what that script does exactly? It looks like it might work, but if I can see why I won't be back here with the same question tomorrow :p. –  Chris O'Kelly Jun 10 '13 at 22:53
    
@ChrisO'Kelly I think it's basically the sed equivalent of my awk answer. Your choice which you find more understandable. –  Barmar Jun 10 '13 at 23:15
    
@Barmar I find yours more understandable, is there a noticeable difference in efficiency between the two that you know of? –  Chris O'Kelly Jun 10 '13 at 23:27
    
No idea, benchmark them. –  Barmar Jun 10 '13 at 23:29
    
@ChrisO'Kelly sed edit. –  potong Jun 11 '13 at 6:10
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awk '/^\s*Account\s\+Customer Order No\.\s\+Whse\s\+Payment Terms\s\+Stock No\.\s\+Original Invoice No\.$/ { 
    getline;
    if (/^\s*VIN No\.$/) getline;
    print;
    exit;
}'
share|improve this answer
    
this is far more readable than anything I've seen for sed! I can understand what it is doing just from a glance. Giving it to the end of the day, but this is likely my accepted answer. Thanks! –  Chris O'Kelly Jun 10 '13 at 23:14
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