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I am looking for a fast alternative for the R function rowsum in C++ / Rcpp / Eigen or Armadillo.

The purpose is to get the sum of elements in a vector a according to a grouping vector b. For example:

> a
 [1] 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2    
> b
 [1] 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2
> rowsum(a,b)
  [,1]
1   10
2   10

Writing a simple for loop in Rcpp is very slow, but maybe my code was just inefficient.

I tried also to call the function rowsum in Rcpp, however, rowsum is not very fast.

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closed as not a real question by Dirk Eddelbuettel, Matthew Lundberg, Josh O'Brien, Romain Francois, Graviton Jun 10 '13 at 4:41

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
The code does not use the offered data. You are using rowsum on a vector when it is designed to be used with matrices. You have offered no Cpp code. –  BondedDust Jun 7 '13 at 2:08
2  
rowsum dispatches rowsum.default in the above case and that already calls out to C code so it should be reasonably fast already. You might be able to get a tiny bit of speed improvement by directly calling rowsum.default or .Internal(rowsum_matrix(...)) although the latter is discouraged and is not allowed on CRAN. –  G. Grothendieck Jun 7 '13 at 3:27
1  
Have you checked the Armadillo manual here: arma.sourceforge.net/docs.html#sum There are at least some sum functions, do the suit your purpose? –  Daniel Fischer Jun 7 '13 at 4:53
1  
Sounds like something data.table would excel at... –  Paul Hiemstra Jun 7 '13 at 13:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's my attempt at doing this using Rcpp (first time using the package, so do point out my inefficiencies):

library(inline)
library(Rcpp)

rowsum_helper = cxxfunction(signature(x = "numeric", y = "integer"), '
  NumericVector var(x);
  IntegerVector factor(y);

  std::vector<double> sum(*std::max_element(factor.begin(), factor.end()) + 1,
                          std::numeric_limits<double>::quiet_NaN());
  for (int i = 0, size = var.size(); i < size; ++i) {
    if (sum[factor[i]] != sum[factor[i]]) sum[factor[i]] = var[i];
    else sum[factor[i]] += var[i];
  }

  return NumericVector(sum.begin(), sum.end());
', plugin = "Rcpp")

rowsum_fast = function(x, y) {
  res = rowsum_helper(x, y)
  elements = which(!is.nan(res))
  list(elements - 1, res[elements])
}

It's pretty fast for Martin's example data, but will only work if the factor consists of non-negative integers and will consume memory on the order of the largest integer in the factor vector (one obvious improvement to the above is to subtract min from max to decrease memory usage - which can be done in either the R function or the C++ one).

n = 1e7; x = runif(n); f = sample(n/2, n, T)

system.time(rowsum(x,f))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   14.241  0.170  14.412

system.time({tabulate(f); sum(x)})
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.216   0.027   0.252

system.time(rowsum_fast(x,f))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.313   0.045   0.358

Also note that a lot of the slowdown (as compared to tabulate) happens in the R code, so if you move that to C++ instead, you should see more improvement:

system.time(rowsum_helper(x,f))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.210   0.018   0.228

Here's a generalization that will handle almost any y, but will be a little bit slower (I'd actually prefer doing this in Rcpp, but don't know how to handle arbitrary R types there):

rowsum_fast = function(x, y) {
  if (is.numeric(y)) {
    y.min = min(y)
    y = y - y.min
    res = rowsum_helper(x, y)
  } else {
    y = as.factor(y)
    res = rowsum_helper(x, as.numeric(y))
  }

  elements = which(!is.nan(res))

  if (is.factor(y)) {
    list(levels(y)[elements-1], res[elements])
  } else {
    list(elements - 1 + y.min, res[elements])
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great code! Thank you very much! –  Ben Jun 7 '13 at 19:41

Not an answer, but maybe helpful for framing the issue. Seems like worst-case performance is to sum many short groups, and this seems to scale linearly with the size of the vector

> n = 100000; x = runif(n); f = sample(n/2, n, TRUE)
> system.time(rowsum(x, f))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.228   0.000   0.229 
> n = 1000000; x = runif(n); f = sample(n/2, n, TRUE)
> system.time(rowsum(x, f)) 
   user  system elapsed 
  1.468   0.040   1.514 
> n = 10000000; x = runif(n); f = sample(n/2, n, TRUE)
> system.time(rowsum(x, f))
   user  system elapsed 
 17.369   0.748  18.166 

There seem to be two short-cuts available, avoiding re-ordering

> n = 10000000; x = runif(n); f = sample(n/2, n, TRUE)
> system.time(rowsum(x, f, reorder=FALSE))
   user  system elapsed 
 16.501   0.476  17.025 

and avoiding an internal coercion to character

> n = 10000000; x = runif(n); f = as.character(sample(n/2, n, TRUE)); 
> system.time(rowsum(x, f, reorder=FALSE))
   user  system elapsed 
  8.652   0.268   8.949 

And then the basic operations that would seem to be involved -- figuring out the unique values of the grouping factor (to pre-allocate a result vector) and doing the sum

> n = 10000000; x = runif(n); f = sample(n/2, n, TRUE)
> system.time({ t = tabulate(f); sum(x) })
   user  system elapsed 
  0.640   0.000   0.643 

so yes, it seems like there's quite a bit of scope for a faster single-purpose implementation. This seems like a natural for data.table, and not too hard to implement in C. Here's a mixed solution, using R to do the tabulation and the 'classic' C interface to do the sum

library(inline)

rowsum1.1 <- function(x, f) {
    t <- tabulate(f)
    crowsum1(x, f, t)
}

crowsum1 = cfunction(c(x_in="numeric", f_in="integer", t_in = "integer"), "
    SEXP res_out;
    double *x = REAL(x_in), *res;
    int len = Rf_length(x_in), *f = INTEGER(f_in);

    res_out = PROTECT(Rf_allocVector(REALSXP, Rf_length(t_in)));
    res = REAL(res_out);
    memset(res, 0, Rf_length(t_in) * sizeof(double));
    for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i)
        res[f[i] - 1] += x[i];
    UNPROTECT(1);
    return res_out;
")

with

> system.time(r1.1 <- rowsum1.1(x, f))
   user  system elapsed 
  1.276   0.092   1.373 

To actually return a result that is identical to rowsum, this needs to be shaped as a matrix with appropriate dim names

rowsum1 <- function(x, f) {
    t <- tabulate(f)
    r <- crowsum1(x, f, t)
    keep <- which(t != 0)
    matrix(r[keep], ncol=1, dimnames=list(keep, NULL))
}

> system.time(r1 <- rowsum1(x, f))
   user  system elapsed 
  9.312   0.300   9.641

so for all that work we're only 2x faster (and much less general -- x must be numeric, f must be integer; no NA values). Yes, there are inefficiencies, e.g., allocating space levels that have no counts (though this avoids an expensive coercion to character vector for names).

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I am impressed! That is pretty much exactly what I was looking for! My framework requires the specifications of rowsum1, x is numeric and f are integers. And anyhow, your function is 4x faster than rowsum on my Computer. :) –  Ben Jun 7 '13 at 16:26
    
Martin. IIRC, Rf_allocVector does not set the initial values to 0.0. I think initial values of res[i] are garbage –  Romain Francois Jun 8 '13 at 10:10
    
@RomainFrancois oops, fixed, thanks. –  Martin Morgan Jun 8 '13 at 12:25
    
Also, thinking about this some more. The which test in rowsum1 could be wrong about which to keep (same problem on my answer I guess), e.g. with x = c(1,-1,1,-1) and f = c(1L,1L,2L,2L). –  Romain Francois Jun 9 '13 at 18:35
    
which(t != 0) is better, thanks again Romain. Even more discouraging -- a lot of work, incomplete implementation, new bugs, and still not that much faster. –  Martin Morgan Jun 9 '13 at 18:57

To complement Martin's code, here is some Rcpp based version.

int increment_maybe(int value, double vec_i){
    return vec_i == 0 ? value : ( value +1 ) ;  
}

// [[Rcpp::export]]
NumericVector cpprowsum2(NumericVector x, IntegerVector f){
    std::vector<double> vec(10) ;
    vec.reserve(1000); 
    int n=x.size(); 
    for( int i=0; i<n; i++){
        int index=f[i]; 
        while( index >= vec.size() ){
            vec.resize( vec.size() * 2 ) ;    
        }
        vec[ index ] += x[i] ;
    }
    // count the number of non zeros
    int s = std::accumulate( vec.begin(), vec.end(), 0, increment_maybe) ; 
    NumericVector result(s) ;
    CharacterVector names(s) ;

    std::vector<double>::iterator it = vec.begin() ;
    for( int i=0, j=0 ; j<s; j++ ,++it, ++i ){
        // move until the next non zero value
        while( ! *it ){ i++ ; ++it ;}
        result[j] = *it ;
        names[j]  = i ;
    }
    result.attr( "dim" ) = IntegerVector::create(s, 1) ;
    result.attr( "dimnames" ) = List::create(names, R_NilValue) ; 
    return result ;
}

The C++ code deals with everything, including formatting into the matrix format given by rowsum, and shows (slightly) better performance (at least on the example).

# from Martin's answer
> system.time(r1 <- rowsum1(x, f))
   user  system elapsed
  0.014   0.001   0.015

> system.time(r3 <- cpprowsum2(x, f))
   user  system elapsed
  0.011   0.001   0.013

> identical(r1, r3)
[1] TRUE
share|improve this answer
    
Nice work. Feel like writing it up for the Rcpp Gallery? ;-) –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jun 8 '13 at 14:41
    
Maybe. I gotta get familiar with the whole process anyway. –  Romain Francois Jun 8 '13 at 17:32
    
Nothing to it -- don't let the git stuff confuse you. Look at any one post, see the 'source' link and look at its source. Either .cpp with comments, or .Rmd. We can continue over Google Chat / Hangouts if you want. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jun 8 '13 at 17:37
    
@Dirk, you should do that! :) –  Ben Jun 8 '13 at 20:30

In a comment and 'answer' that @Ben has deleted, it turns out that f is ordered and increasing.

n = 1e7; x = runif(n);
f <- cumsum(c(1L, sample(c(TRUE, FALSE), n - 1, TRUE)))

So

rowsum3 <- function(x, f)
{
    y <- cumsum(x)
    end <- c(f[-length(f)] != f[-1], TRUE)
    diff(c(0, y[end]))
}

is a common R solution (if one is not too concerned about precision), and

crowsum3 <- cfunction(c(x_in="numeric", f_in="integer"), "
    int j = 0, *f = INTEGER(f_in), len = Rf_length(f_in), 
        len_out = len == 0 ? 0 : f[len - 1];
    SEXP res = Rf_allocVector(REALSXP, len_out);
    double *x = REAL(x_in), *r = REAL(res);
    memset(r, 0, len_out * sizeof(double));
    for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
        if (i != 0 && f[i] != f[i-1]) ++j;
        r[j] += x[i];
    }
    return res;
")

could be a C solution. These have timings

> system.time(r3 <- rowsum3(x, f))
   user  system elapsed 
  1.116   0.120   1.238 
> system.time(c3 <- crowsum3(x, f))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.080   0.000   0.081 

and the loss of precision in the R implementation is apparent

> all.equal(r3, c3)
[1] TRUE
> identical(r3, c3)
[1] FALSE

rowsum_helper has

> system.time(r2 <- rowsum_helper(x, f))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.464   0.004   0.470 

but also assumes 0-based indexing so

> head(rowsum_helper(x, f))
[1]       NaN 0.9166577 0.4380485 0.7777094 2.0866507 0.7300764
> head(crowsum3(x, f))
[1] 0.9166577 0.4380485 0.7777094 2.0866507 0.7300764 0.7195091
share|improve this answer
    
Same here, beware on non initialized values for res. –  Romain Francois Jun 8 '13 at 10:31
    
@RomainFrancois no, the original version initialized r correctly; crowsum3(numeric(), integer()) didn't do good things, though! –  Martin Morgan Jun 8 '13 at 12:37

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