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We have 2 tables in SQL Server 2008 R2. Periodically, we have to insert a batch of records from Table A to Table B. While the inserting, Table B still able to SELECT & UPDATE. Currently, we use INSERT..SELECT to copy from Table A to Table B. But the problem is while inserting, sometimes will cause UPDATE statement to TABLE B timeout.

Is there a better bulk insert solution from a table to another that won't cause blocking?

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you can run update in smaller batches, like using "update top(5000) ..." in a loop –  Stanley Jun 7 '13 at 2:09
    
i think you are referring to insert in smaller batches. It is a good idea. But then we need to keep track which record has been copy over to prevent duplication in TABLE B. –  kevin Jun 7 '13 at 2:20
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2 Answers

They most obvious solution is to use smaller batches as Stanley suggested. If this is really not an option you could explore '(transaction level) snapshot isolation.

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Yup. So far Suggestion from Stanley and Option 3 from TT are the most workable now. –  kevin Jun 7 '13 at 7:18
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1 Set the transaction timeout to a large enough value, so that the statement no longer goes in timeout.

2 Use CURSOR and do it row by row

3 Try this way of doing things. Requires a row identifier (IDENTITY for instance), best to have a PK or INDEX on that field:

SET NOCOUNT ON;

CREATE TABLE #A(
    row_id INT IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    data INT NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE #B(
    row_id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    data INT NOT NULL
);

-- TRUNCATE TABLE #B; -- no truncate needed since you just want to add rows, not copy the whole table

DECLARE @batch_size INT;
SET @batch_size = 10000;

DECLARE @from_row_id INT;
DECLARE @to_row_id INT;

-- You would use this to establish the first @from_row_id if you wanted to copy the whole table
-- SELECT
--   @from_row_id=ISNULL(MIN(row_id),-1)
-- FROM
--   #A AS a;

SELECT
    @from_row_id=ISNULL(MAX(row_id),-1)
FROM
    #B AS b;

IF @from_row_id=-1
    SELECT
        @from_row_id=ISNULL(MIN(row_id),-1)
    FROM
        #A AS a;
ELSE
    SELECT
        @from_row_id=ISNULL(MIN(row_id),-1)
    FROM
        #A AS a
    WHERE
        row_id>@from_row_id;

WHILE @from_row_id>=0
BEGIN
    SELECT
        @to_row_id=ISNULL(MAX(row_id),-1)
    FROM
        (
            SELECT TOP(@batch_size)
                row_id
            FROM
                #A AS a
            WHERE
                row_id>=@from_row_id
        ) AS row_ids

    IF @to_row_id=-1
    BEGIN
        INSERT 
            #B
        SELECT
            *
        FROM
            #A AS a
        WHERE
            row_id>=@from_row_id;

        BREAK;
    END
    ELSE
        INSERT 
            #B
        SELECT
            *
        FROM
            #A AS a
        WHERE
            row_id BETWEEN @from_row_id AND @to_row_id;

    SELECT
        @from_row_id=ISNULL(MIN(row_id),-1)
    FROM
        #A AS a
    WHERE
        row_id>@to_row_id;
END 

DROP TABLE #B;
DROP TABLE #A;
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Thanks. Need to test option 2 & 3. Time taken to insert whole batch VS acceptable blocking duration. –  kevin Jun 7 '13 at 7:17
    
@kevin I'd go for option 3 before option 2, using a CURSOR would be less efficient in general as you would copy row by row instead of bulk inserting as in option 3. If you find the script useful, please upvote and/or check the "solution" mark. –  TT. Jun 7 '13 at 7:20
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