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I needed to sync some background threads I got in my iOS app. I needed something to hold the execution of one thread while the other did its job, in order to keep the execution of the code linear.

I've been fighting with this code all day, and after a lot of reading I came up with this code:

-(void)waitOne:(double)timeout
{
if (!shouldRun)
{
    shouldRun = true;

    double runs = 0;
    do {
        NSDate* next = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceNow:0.5];
        [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] runMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode beforeDate:next];
        runs++;
    } while ((runs/2) < timeout && shouldRun);
}
else
{
    @throw [NSException exceptionWithName:@"InvalidHandle" reason:@"The currenct handle is in use" userInfo:nil];
}
}

I can tell you that it got the job done. But I also found some bad feedback at the forum where I found the idea for that algorithm, saying that "it'll make your loop busy wait" and that was a bad idea. So, I come here to ask. Is there a better way to accomplish what I want?

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1  
Yes, this isn't ideal; there are more efficient (and less verbose) ways of structuring this kind of thing. But you should say a bunch more about the bigger picture-- what are you doing on each thread, what are you waiting for, how are you creating the threads? You'll get better suggestions that way. –  Ben Zotto Jun 7 '13 at 3:21
1  
You don't need to write ways to do this, they already exist in Cocoa Touch itself (see NSLock, Grand Central Dispatch, NSOperation, etc) –  borrrden Jun 7 '13 at 3:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Look into [NSCondition] which enables you to wait and signal threads

Basically you allocate a NSCondition and in the block you'll have [condition wait]; which will cause the thread to wait. then, when the async operation is done, you call [condition signal]; which will signal the waiting thread to continue.

http://developer.apple.com/DOCUMENTATION/Cocoa/Reference/NSCondition_class/Reference/Reference.html

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It is amazing how easy is to get a response when you got the right question hehe. Thanks man! –  Lucas Phillip Jun 7 '13 at 12:54

For future reference, if anyone needs, here's how my code ended up:

@implementation WaitHandle

@synthesize isWaiting;

-(void)waitOne:(double)timeout
{
    if (!isWaiting)
    {
        isWaiting = true;
        if (timeout <= 0) {
            timeout = 0.1;
        }
        [handle waitUntilDate:[NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceNow:timeout]];
    }
}

-(void)signal
{
    [handle signal];
}

-(id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self != nil)
    {
        isWaiting = false;
        handle = [[NSCondition alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}

-(void)dealloc
{
    [self signal];
}
@end
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