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Suppose I have the following code:

package main

import "fmt"

type Car struct{
    year int
    make string
}

func (c *Car)String() string{
    return fmt.Sprintf("{make:%s, year:%d}", c.make, c.year)
}

func main() {
    myCar := Car{year:1996, make:"Toyota"}
    fmt.Println(myCar)
}

When I call fmt.Println(myCar) and the object in question is a pointer, my String() method gets called properly. If, however the object is a value, my output is formatted using the default formatting built into Go and my code to format the said object is not called.

The interesting thing is in either case if I call myCar.String() manually it works properly whether my object is either a pointer or value.

How can I get my object formatted the way I want no matter if the object is value-based or pointer-based when used with Println?

I don't want to use a value method for String because then that means every time it's invoked the object is copied which seams unreasonable. And I don't want to have to always manually called .String() either because I'm trying to let the duck-typing system do it's work.

Thanks in advance!

-Ralph

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up vote 28 down vote accepted

When calling fmt.Println, myCar is implicitly converted to a value of type interface{} as you can see from the function signature. The code from the fmt package then does a type switch to figure out how to print this value, looking something like this:

switch v := v.(type) {
case string:
    os.Stdout.WriteString(v)
case fmt.Stringer:
    os.Stdout.WriteString(v.String())
// ...
}

However, the fmt.Stringer case fails because Car doesn't implement String (as it is defined on *Car). Calling String manually works because the compiler sees that String needs a *Car and thus automatically converts myCar.String() to (&myCar).String(). For anything regarding interfaces, you have to do it manually. So you either have to implement String on Car or always pass a pointer to fmt.Println:

fmt.Println(&myCar)
share|improve this answer
    
I suppose it is also partly because the language won't give you a pointer to what is stored inside an interface value (since that address may end up representing a different type if something else is assigned to the interface). – James Henstridge Jun 7 '13 at 10:53

Generally speaking, it's best to avoid assigning values to variables via static initializers, i.e.

f := Foo{bar:1,baz:"2"}

This is because it can create exactly the complaint you're talking about, if you forget to pass foo as a pointer via &foo or you decide to use value receivers you end up making a lot of clones of your values.

Instead, try to assign pointers to static initializers by default, i.e.

f := &Foo{bar:1,baz:"2"}

This way f will always be a pointer and the only time you'll get a value copy is if you explicitly use value receivers.

(There are of course times when you want to store the value from a static initializer, but those should be edge cases)

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Define your fmt.Stringer on a pointer receiver:

package main

import "fmt"

type Car struct {
        year int
        make string
}

func (c *Car) String() string {
        return fmt.Sprintf("{maker:%s, produced:%d}", c.make, c.year)
}

func main() {
        myCar := Car{year: 1996, make: "Toyota"}
        myOtherCar := &Car{year: 2013, make: "Honda"}
        fmt.Println(&myCar)
        fmt.Println(myOtherCar)
}

Playground


Output:

{maker:Toyota, produced:1996}
{maker:Honda, produced:2013}    

Then, always pass a pointer to instances of Car to fmt.Println. This way a potentially expensive value copy is avoided under your control.

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Methods

Pointers vs. Values

The rule about pointers vs. values for receivers is that value methods can be invoked on pointers and values, but pointer methods can only be invoked on pointers. This is because pointer methods can modify the receiver; invoking them on a copy of the value would cause those modifications to be discarded.

Therefore, for your String method to work when invoked on both pointers and values, use a value receiver. For example,

package main

import "fmt"

type Car struct {
    year int
    make string
}

func (c Car) String() string {
    return fmt.Sprintf("{make:%s, year:%d}", c.make, c.year)
}

func main() {
    myCar := Car{year: 1996, make: "Toyota"}
    fmt.Println(myCar)
    fmt.Println(&myCar)
}

Output:

{make:Toyota, year:1996}
{make:Toyota, year:1996}
share|improve this answer
9  
Does this basically mean that if i have a large struct, that every time it goes through Println It will be copied? Like I said in my post this seams unreasonable. – Ralph Caraveo Jun 7 '13 at 14:56

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