Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following header function is not working. I ma trying to go to login if the user is not logged in -

    <?PHP
    if (logged_in() === false) {
    header('Location: login.php');
    }
    ?>

However if I do -

    <?PHP
    if (logged_in() === false) {
    echo"No user is logged in";
    }
    ?>

It does echo it and I can see that it says no user is logged in

It is basically just checking if there is a user logged in

    function logged_in() {
    return (isset($_SESSION['user_id'])) ? true : false;
    }
share|improve this question
1  
explain logged_in() –  6339 Jun 7 '13 at 5:11
1  
wild guess, logged_in() does some output, and header() then issue a warning and doesn't work –  RC. Jun 7 '13 at 5:14
2  
<?php ob_start(); // code ob_end_flush(); ?> –  Fasil kk Jun 7 '13 at 5:15
2  
You need to include session_start(); as your first line of code after <?php in every affected/used file. Give that a try. –  Fred -ii- Jun 7 '13 at 5:23
2  
@Fasilkk You should get the credit for this. Post it as an answer and I'll upvote it. –  Fred -ii- Jun 7 '13 at 5:43

3 Answers 3

Make sure that there is no output(white-space also) in your code.

you can use ob_start() and ob_end_flush() to clear out-put.

<?php ob_start();

 // code 

ob_end_flush(); ?>
share|improve this answer
    
Although this solved the problem, it'd be good to explain why, for future visitors viewing this question. –  Daedalus Jun 7 '13 at 5:45
    
@Daedalus Like 90% of the questions with answers on SO, most post a link to PHP.net anyway, so it's irrelevant. Give the guy a break. –  Fred -ii- Jun 7 '13 at 5:48
    
@Fred As I already said, this is for others, not myself. –  Daedalus Jun 7 '13 at 6:43
    
@Daedalus... I added small explanation too.. I think that is enough to understand for all. –  Fasil kk Jun 7 '13 at 6:44

Try to put exit() or die() after the header like

  if (logged_in() === false) {
      header('Location: login.php');
      exit();    //or die();
  }

But makesure that your login.php should be in the same folder

share|improve this answer
    
Please consider my edit... –  Gautam3164 Jun 7 '13 at 5:18
    
Thanks for the help. I figured it out I needed the ob_start and ob_end_flush –  avink Jun 7 '13 at 5:32
    
@AvinashKunaparaju Ahem, Fasil kk figured it out ;-) –  Fred -ii- Jun 7 '13 at 5:36
    
@Fred thank you.. thank you..:) –  Fasil kk Jun 7 '13 at 6:48

You probably need to include the fully qualified domain and path to the new url. There is a note on the official documentation for the header function indicating as such.

Note:

HTTP/1.1 requires an absolute URI as argument to » Location: including the scheme, hostname and absolute path, but some clients accept relative URIs. You can usually use $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'], $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] and dirname() to make an absolute URI from a relative one yourself:

This note also contains the following code sample.

<?php 
/* Redirect to a different page in the current directory that was requested */ 
$host  = $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST']; 
$uri   = rtrim(dirname($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']), '/\\'); 
$extra = 'login.php';
header("Location: http://$host$uri/$extra"); 
exit; 
?>
share|improve this answer
    
Every browser supports relative URLs, and W3C or IETF is planning on changing the spec to say that it's allowed. –  Barmar Jun 7 '13 at 5:25
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/8250259/… –  Barmar Jun 7 '13 at 5:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.