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I am testing the speed of getting data from Dictionary VS list.
I've used this code to test :

    internal class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        List<Grade> grades = Grade.GetData().ToList();
        List<Student> students = Student.GetStudents().ToList();

        stopwatch.Start();
        foreach (Student student in students)
        {
            student.Grade = grades.Single(x => x.StudentId == student.Id).Value;
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Using list {0}", stopwatch.Elapsed);
        stopwatch.Reset();
        students = Student.GetStudents().ToList();
        stopwatch.Start();
        Dictionary<Guid, string> dic = Grade.GetData().ToDictionary(x => x.StudentId, x => x.Value);
        foreach (Student student in students)
        {
            student.Grade = dic[student.Id];
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Using dictionary {0}", stopwatch.Elapsed);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public class GuidHelper
{
    public static List<Guid> ListOfIds=new List<Guid>();

    static GuidHelper()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
        {
            ListOfIds.Add(Guid.NewGuid());
        }
    }
}


public class Grade
{
    public Guid StudentId { get; set; }
    public string Value { get; set; }

    public static IEnumerable<Grade> GetData()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
        {
            yield return new Grade
                             {
                                 StudentId = GuidHelper.ListOfIds[i], Value = "Value " + i
                             };
        }
    }
}

public class Student
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Grade { get; set; }

    public static IEnumerable<Student> GetStudents()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
        {
            yield return new Student
                             {
                                 Id = GuidHelper.ListOfIds[i],
                                 Name = "Name " + i
                             };
        }
    }
}

There is list of students and grades in memory they have StudentId in common.
In first way I tried to find Grade of a student using LINQ on a list that takes near 7 seconds on my machine and in another way first I converted List into dictionary then finding grades of student from dictionary using key that takes less than a second . enter image description here

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1  
Have you tried the other way around (test using dictionary first and then using the list later on)? –  Fendy Jun 7 '13 at 6:44
    
@Fendy Yes . No difference. –  Unforgiven Jun 7 '13 at 6:55
5  
It's called a Shlemiel the painter's algorithm. The answers explain why that is. –  Michael Kjörling Jun 7 '13 at 7:47
    
15 votes, 2 favorites... My time to shine! Why is it harder to pick an element by it's index from list than from array? What a brilliant question, huh? –  Harold Jun 7 '13 at 12:38
5  
Having some knowledge on simple data structures really helps programming so I suggest you to read some information on that. –  Alvin Wong Jun 7 '13 at 12:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 69 down vote accepted

When you do this:

student.Grade = grades.Single(x => x.StudentId == student.Id).Value;

As written it has to enumerate the entire List until it finds the entry in the List that has the correct studentId (does entry 0 match the lambda? No... Does entry 1 match the lambda? No... etc etc). This is O(n). Since you do it once for every student, it is O(n^2).

However when you do this:

student.Grade = dic[student.Id];

If you want to find a certain element by key in a dictionary, it can instantly jump to where it is in the dictionary - this is O(1). O(n) for doing it for every student. (If you want to know how this is done - Dictionary runs a mathematical operation on the key, which turns it into a value that is a place inside the dictionary, which is the same place it put it when it was inserted)

So, dictionary is faster because you used a better algorithm.

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45  
Also, because Single was used, it will keep iterating until the end to ensure that only one element exists (or throw an exception if one is found). –  DaveShaw Jun 7 '13 at 8:49
1  
Is this a cryptic way to describe a balanced tree, or are those separate algorithms? Nut sure if I confuse things, but b-tree would mean O(log n) instead of O(1). –  Zsolt Szilagy Jun 7 '13 at 12:37
1  
Finding a element in a Dictionary is not O(1), the average case is likely O(log n). –  Tim B Jun 7 '13 at 12:53
1  
@TimB A tree is O(log(n)) because it is as deep as log(n) where n is the number of elements. In a hash table you look in the table once and there it is. Of course if it's congested you might have to check the second, or the third, but the thing is that how many 'misses' you get is not a function of n, it's a function of how much space you allocated for the hash table. –  Patashu Jun 7 '13 at 13:42
6  
just to provide the terminology, a hashtable is said to have amortized cost of O(1). Not exactly O(1). due to the reasons Patashu gave –  im so confused Jun 7 '13 at 14:21

When using Dictionary you are using a key to retrieve your information, which enables it to find it more efficiently, with List you are using Single Linq expression, which since it is a list, has no other option other than to look in entire list for wanted the item.

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Dictionary uses hashing to search for the data. Each item in the dictionary is stored in buckets of items that contain the same hash. It's a lot quicker.

Try sorting your list, it will be a a bit quicker then.

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The reason is because a dictionary is a lookup, while a list is an iteration.

Dictionary uses a hash lookup, while your list requires walking through the list until it finds the result from beginning to the result each time.

to put it another way. The list will be faster than the dictionary on the first item, because there's nothing to look up. it's the first item, boom.. it's done. but the second time the list has to look through the first item, then the second item. The third time through it has to look through the first item, then the second item, then the third item.. etc..

So each iteration the lookup takes more and more time. The larger the list, the longer it takes. While the dictionary is always a more or less fixed lookup time (it also increases as the dictionary gets larger, but at a much slower pace, so by comparison it's almost fixed).

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A dictionary uses a hash table, it is a great data structure as it maps an input to a corresponding output almost instantaneously, it has a complexity of O(1) as already pointed out which means more or less immediate retrieval.

The cons of it is that for the sake of performance you need lots of space in advance (depending on the implementation be it separate chaining or linear/quadratic probing you may need at least as much as you're planning to store, probably double in the latter case) and you need a good hashing algorithm that maps uniquely your input ("John Smith") to a corresponding output such as a position in an array (hash_array[34521]).

Also listing the entries in a sorted order is a problem. If I may quote Wikipedia:

Listing all n entries in some specific order generally requires a separate sorting step, whose cost is proportional to log(n) per entry.

Have a read on linear probing and separate chaining for some gorier details :)

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Dictionary is based on a hash table which is a rather efficient algorithm to look up things. In a list you have to go element by element in order to find something.

It's all a matter of data organization...

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When it comes to lookup of data, a keyed collection is always faster than a non-keyed collection. This is because a non-keyed collection will have to enumerate its elements to find what you are looking for. While in a keyed collection you can just access the element directly via the key.

These are some nice articles for comparing list to dictionary.

Here. And this one.

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Arrays and lists are also "keyed collections". Index is a key from [0, n>. Dictionary keys simply have looser constrains on a domain. –  Emperor Orionii Jun 8 '13 at 14:55

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