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I try to sort a 2D double array (double[][]) on the first value. example: {1.0226342823592962,0.0}, {1.0395582845873155,1.0} starting with the biggest value. This is the code I use (java generated half of it)

java.util.Arrays.sort(indexMatrix, new java.util.Comparator<double[]>() {

        @Override
        public int compare(double[] o1, double[] o2) {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub
            return 0;
        }


    });

However my 'indexMatrix' is not changed after. I think it has something to do with public int compare, because the values are so close to each other, if you cast them to int they will all be 1 and cannot be sorted. Or is it something else?

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Is this your complete code? If yes then it will not be sorted because your compare method returns always 0 which means that the elements are the same. –  Uwe Plonus Jun 7 '13 at 8:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why do you cast them to integers? Just use Double.compareTo(Double) method in your sort method:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    double[][] indexMatrix = new double[][] {
                  new double[] { 1.02, 100 }, 
                  new double[] { 1.03, 123 },
                  new double[] { 1.01, 321 } };

    Arrays.sort(indexMatrix, new Comparator<double[]>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(double[] o1, double[] o2) {
            return Double.compare(o2[0], o1[0]);
        }
    });

    for (double[] d : indexMatrix)
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(d));
}

Outputs:

[1.03, 123.0]
[1.02, 100.0]
[1.01, 321.0]
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Ah yes, I see! It works now, thank you! –  tortilla Jun 7 '13 at 8:27

You have to implement the compare method, what you have there is just a template. It is unchanged because return 0 by default means the compared values are equal. Other return values are -1 and +1, based on the actual situation.

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the return values may be positive or negative. I can also return -200 instead of -1. –  Uwe Plonus Jun 7 '13 at 8:21
    
Yes there is no constraint as to the actual value, other than it's signal. –  Peter Jaloveczki Jun 7 '13 at 8:22
    
Indeed, I forgot to put code there. (The automated code is not complete haha) –  tortilla Jun 7 '13 at 8:28

No, you don't cast your doubles to integers. An int is just what compare() expects as a return parameter. It should return 0 if o1 and o2 are equal, a value less than 0 if o1 < o2 and a value greater than 0 if o1 > o2. You can just use Double.compare() for that:

java.util.Arrays.sort(indexMatrix, new java.util.Comparator<double[]>() {
    @Override
    public int compare(double[] o1, double[] o2) {
        // note that o2 comes first here to sort in descending order
        return Double.compare(o2[0], o1[0]);
    }
});
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