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I include a C function from an article on FFT by Sergey Chernenko. This function rearranges data by performing an even-odd decomposition. But instead of using bit reversal it does so by adding 1 in a mirrored manner, which is much faster than other reversing code I have tested.

  /*
      http://www.librow.com/articles/article-10 (Sergey Chernenko)
   */
  void rearrange(float* Data, const unsigned int N) {

     //   Swap position
     unsigned int Target = 0;
     //   Process all positions of input signal
     for (unsigned int Position = 0; Position < N; ++Position)
     {
        //   Only for not yet swapped entries
        if (Target > Position)
        {
           //   Swap entries
           const float Temp = Data[Target];
           Data[Target] = Data[Position];
           Data[Position] = Temp;
        }
        //   Bit mask
        unsigned int Mask = N;
        //   While bit is set
        while (Target & (Mask >>= 1))
           //   Drop bit
           Target &= ~Mask;
        //   The current bit is 0 - set it
        Target |= Mask;
     }
  }

The part that interests me is the the mirrored incrementing code. I understand bit-wise operations in C and I can mentally go through this snippet and validate that it works. What I don't yet understand is why it works. How do I come up with this solution?

        //   Bit mask
        unsigned int Mask = N;
        //   While bit is set
        while (Target & (Mask >>= 1))
           //   Drop bit
           Target &= ~Mask;
        //   The current bit is 0 - set it
        Target |= Mask;
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As a side note, you can see some really nice "Bit Twiddling Hacks" here: graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html Some of them may actually come in handy. –  Akhil Jun 7 '13 at 9:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To understand why this works, first think of how a normal increment functions: given an arbitrary bit pattern, an increment finds a run (which may be empty) of consecutive ones until a zero, clears out all ones, and sets the first zero to one, like this:

0000 0001 -  0 ->  1 | No ones at the back (an empty run): insert 1 right away.
0111 1000 -  7 ->  8 | Replace a run of three ones with zeros, then insert 1
1011 1100 - 11 -> 12 | Replace a run of two ones with zeros, then insert 1

Now consider your algorithm: the regular increment detects runs starting at the back of the number; your loop detects runs starting at the front of the number. Since you say the algorithm "adds one in a mirrored manner", N must be the twice the highest power of two that may be present in the Target. The while loop tries to find a position in the Target where the position of the lone 1 in the Mask matches a zero - the first "hole". The body of the loop clears out all ones in the target, starting with the highest-order one. As soon as the loop stops, the Target |= Mask inserts 1 into the "hole" found by the loop.

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Wow, thanks. You really nailed it. Had to do some scribbling on a piece of paper, but I finally get it, sweet. The while function exits if a 1 can be inserted. If not, it's inserting 0s while there are 1s and inserts a new 1 in the end. –  Davorin Jun 7 '13 at 9:41
1  
@Davorin Correct -- the post-condition of a while loop is the inverse of its continuation condition. Since the continuation condition of your while loop is (Target & Mask) != 0 (I wrote the condition with an explicit comparison to zero and no side effects), the post-condition is (Target & Mask) == 0, which simply means that the 1 can be inserted at the Mask. –  dasblinkenlight Jun 7 '13 at 9:47

It's just emulating addition with 1, position by position. Except with the positions reversed.

To add 1, you keep modifying bit positions (starting with least-significant) until there is no longer a carry.

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