Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following code runs 2 children, who will wait for 10 seconds and terminate. The parent is sitting in a loop, waiting for the children to terminate:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use POSIX ":sys_wait_h";

sub func
# {{{
{
      my $i = shift;
      print "$i started\n";
      $| = 1;
      sleep(10);
      print "$i finished\n";
}
# }}}

my $n = 2;
my @children_pids;

for (my $i = 0; $i < $n; $i++) {
      if ((my $pid = fork()) == 0) {
            func($i);
            exit(0);
      } else {
            $children_pids[$i] = $pid;
      }
}

my $stillWaiting;
do {
      $stillWaiting = 0;
      for (my $i = 0; $i < $n; ++$i) {
            if ($children_pids[$i] > 0)
            {
                  if (waitpid($children_pids[$i], WNOHANG) != 0) {
                        # Child is done
                        print "child done\n";
                        $children_pids[$i] = 0;
                  } else {
                        # Still waiting on this child
                        #print "waiting\n";
                        $stillWaiting = 1;
                  }
            }
            #Give up timeslice and prevent hard loop: this may not work on all flavors of Unix
            sleep(0);
      }
} while ($stillWaiting);

print "parent finished\n";

The code is based upon this answer: Multiple fork() Concurrency

It works correctly, but the parent loop is eating processor time. top command gives this:

enter image description here

Here the answer says:

As an additional bonus, the loop will block on waitpid while children are running, so you don't need a busy loop while you wait.

But for me it doesn't block. What's wrong?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're passing the WNOHANG flag, which makes the call non-blocking. Remove this flag and waitpid will wait at 0% CPU until the child quits.

If you take this approach, you could simplify the code. There's no need to loop until a child is finished, because the blocking waitpid call will do that for you:

for (my $i = 0; $i < $n; ++$i) {
    if ($children_pids[$i] > 0) {
          waitpid($children_pids[$i], 0);
          print "child done\n";
          $children_pids[$i] = 0;
    }
}

Alternatively, change the sleep call to wait for one second. Then your program will check for finished children every second, without pushing up CPU usage.

share|improve this answer
    
plz, change ")" -> "}" at the bottom –  user4035 Jun 7 '13 at 9:30
    
Good point, done :) –  Andomar Jun 7 '13 at 9:32
    
I think I might write it as: while( @children_pids ){ my $pid = shift @children_pids; next unless $pid; waitpid $pid, 0; } which could be simplified to: while( @children_pids ){ waitpid(shift @children_pids, 0) } if you never allow a 0 (or undef) to be put on the list. –  Brad Gilbert Jun 9 '13 at 1:22

Since your parent thread isn't actually doing anything while waiting for it's children, I would simplify it to

#!/usr/bin/perl    
use strict;
use warnings;
$| = 1; # autoflush

sub func{
    my($i) = @_;
    print "$i started\n";
    sleep(10);
    print "$i finished\n";
}

my $n = 2;
my @children_pids;

for my $i ( 0..($n-1) ) { # faster, and clearer than the C-style for loop
    my $pid = fork;
    die "Unable to fork" unless defined $pid; # check for errors
    if ( $pid == 0) { # child
        func($i);
        exit(0); # may need to be POSIX::_exit()
    } else { # parent
        push @children_pids, $pid; # don't allow undef or 0 on the list
    }
}

# while( @children_pids ){
#    waitpid shift @children_pids, 0;
# }

waitpid $_, 0 for @children_pids;

print "parent finished\n";

If your perl is compiled with IThreads you can use the threads module.
( IThreads is required for fork emulation on Windows )

Use of threads also makes it much easier to do what you originally attempted, joining threads as they finish.

use strict;
use warnings;
use threads (); # not using async
$| = 1; # autoflush

sub func{
    my($i) = @_;
    print "$i started\n";
    sleep(rand(10)); # randomize the order of completion for this example
    print "$i finished\n";
    return $i; # <===
}

my $n = 10;

for my $i ( 0..($n-1) ){
   my $thread = threads->create( \&func, $i ); # ask for scalar value
   die "unable to create thread $i" unless defined $thread;
}

while( threads->list ){
    # join the threads that are done
    for my $thread ( threads->list(threads::joinable) ){
        print 'thread-id: ',  $thread->tid, ' returned: ', $thread->join, "\n";
    }

    # be nice to other threads and processes
    threads->yield;

    # allows the threads to "bunch up" for this example
    # not necessary for real code.
    sleep 2;
}
0 started
1 started
2 started
3 started
4 started
5 started
6 started
7 started
7 finished
8 started
9 started
2 finished
thread-id: 3 returned: 2
thread-id: 8 returned: 7
8 finished
5 finished
thread-id: 6 returned: 5
thread-id: 9 returned: 8
1 finished
thread-id: 2 returned: 1
3 finished
6 finished
9 finished
4 finished
thread-id: 4 returned: 3
thread-id: 5 returned: 4
thread-id: 7 returned: 6
thread-id: 10 returned: 9
0 finished
thread-id: 1 returned: 0
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.