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I am using a ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor which runs a ScheduledFuture every x (currently 100) msec . The task takes just a couple of msec to execute.

Trying to cancel it and interrupt possibly running tasks, by calling future.cancel(true), I observe that although the future shall terminate, the task is still executed, causing program errors. From my log output it seems that the cancelling takes place during the last execution, but cancelling it does NOT interrupt the Thread, instead it is allowed to run till its end. Also this last execution takes several times longer than the previous ones. This behaviour is reproducible but does not happen always.

To my knowledge cancelling shall immediately call interrupt() in my thread, giving me the option to react accordingly?? The weird thing is that if I artificially extend the task duration by sleeping some time at the end of run(), the interruption happens as I expected.

Does anyone have an explanation for this behaviour? Since it seems to be depending on the task duration I thought about maybe there is some weird heuristic implemented in the executor service to plan the execution schedule which is going wrong. Is there any other (smarter) way the handle the problem?

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"To my knowledge cancelling shall immediately call interrupt() in my thread, giving me the option to react accordingly??" => yes: how do you react when your thread is interrupted? Thread.sleep is interruptible, but how about your own code? –  assylias Jun 7 '13 at 10:10

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To my knowledge cancelling shall immediately call interrupt() in my thread, giving me the option to react accordingly?? The weird thing is that if I artificially extend the task runtime by sleeping some time at the end of run(), the interruption happens as I expected.

If you interrupt a thread, it basically sets a flag. If you don't check this flag, or call something which does, nothing happens as you have seen. Thread.sleep() does check, but you can check yourself with Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted();

Is there any other (smarter) way the handle the problem?

Write your code so the task checks whether it should still do something. I wouldn't rely on interrupt alone to do this. BTW Some third party libraries incorrectly consume an interrupt or handle them in ways you might not expect.

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OK that was easy.. I thought overriding interrupt() would handle it. Guess theres always something new to learn –  dschuld Jun 7 '13 at 10:24
    
I wouldn't override interrupt() –  Peter Lawrey Jun 7 '13 at 11:19

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