Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume I have a schema like:

group
-----
id

site
----
id
group_id (optional)

person
------
id
group_id (one of these two must exist 
site_id   and the other must be null)

device
------
id 
group_id  (one of these three must exist 
site_id    and the others must be null)
person_id  

I don't like this representation, but I'm struggling to find a better one.

The two alternatives I've thought of are:

device
------
id 
parent_table_name
parent_id

(but this is bad because I can't have foreign keys any more)

and:

entity
------
id

group
-----
entity_id

site
----
entity_id
link_entity_id (optional)

person
------
entity_id
link_entity_id (optional)

device
------
entity_id
link_entity_id

This is also less than perfect. It's really the Django ORMs method of inheritance, where entity is the parent of all the other classes.

Is there a better way of structuring the data, or is SQL just at odds with DAGs?

Is there a way of adding CONSTRAINTs to the person and device tables?

share|improve this question
    
I'd remove the id's from device and create three separate linktables to group, site and person. Relationally, that's to me the right way to do it. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 7 '13 at 10:32
    
@Lieven Keersmaekers that would make queries more complex and slow - what's the benefit? –  chrisdew Jun 7 '13 at 10:35
    
It's normalized that way and self explanatory to anyone. I started working in maintenance a half year ago and I can assure you that with no prior domain knowledge, all other solutions are harder to get a grip on for newcomers. Having seperate tables immediatelly tells me that a device belongs to either a group, site or person but no more. Having all id's in one table doesn't readily tell me that. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 7 '13 at 11:04
    
As for the slow remark: I would be hard pressed that you would see a notable performance hit. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 7 '13 at 11:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following MySQL structure should normalize just fine. It will make your queries a little more complicated to write for some occasions, but it will make the application more powerful and able to grow exponentially without taking a hit on performance. We have a large MySQL database with many relating tables that hold foreign keys for people to various interviews, notes, and other data that works terrific! One note is that if you use group as a table name remember to use `` marks like:

`group`

That way MySQL does not try to invalidate a INNER JOIN group ON (foo=bar) and expect GROUP BY. You will also have to put restraints in the front end of your application that would prevent a device being added without a parent if that is the desired goal. But that is not too hard to do. Anyways look at the examples and have fun experimenting/programming!

Online Demo: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/e9e94/2/0

Here is the proposed MySQL table structure with the smallest amount of data to account for one instance of each needed case from your question: Copy and Paste into .sql file and import to empty database using phpMyAdmin

-- phpMyAdmin SQL Dump
-- version 3.5.2.2
-- http://www.phpmyadmin.net
--
-- Host: 127.0.0.1
-- Generation Time: Jun 07, 2013 at 08:14 PM
-- Server version: 5.5.27
-- PHP Version: 5.4.7

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0;
SET SQL_MODE="NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO";
SET time_zone = "+00:00";


/*!40101 SET @OLD_CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT=@@CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT */;
/*!40101 SET @OLD_CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS=@@CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS */;
/*!40101 SET @OLD_COLLATION_CONNECTION=@@COLLATION_CONNECTION */;
/*!40101 SET NAMES utf8 */;

--
-- Database: `stackoverflow`
--

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `device`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `device` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=7 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `device`
--

INSERT INTO `device` (`id`) VALUES
(1),
(2),
(3),
(4),
(5),
(6);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `group`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `group` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=9 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `group`
--

INSERT INTO `group` (`id`) VALUES
(1),
(2),
(3),
(4),
(5),
(6),
(7),
(8);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `groups_have_devices`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `groups_have_devices` (
  `group_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `device_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`group_id`,`device_id`),
  KEY `device_id` (`device_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

--
-- Dumping data for table `groups_have_devices`
--

INSERT INTO `groups_have_devices` (`group_id`, `device_id`) VALUES
(4, 6);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `groups_have_people`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `groups_have_people` (
  `group_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `person_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`group_id`,`person_id`),
  KEY `person_id` (`person_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

--
-- Dumping data for table `groups_have_people`
--

INSERT INTO `groups_have_people` (`group_id`, `person_id`) VALUES
(1, 2),
(5, 5);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `groups_have_sites`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `groups_have_sites` (
  `group_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `site_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`group_id`,`site_id`),
  KEY `site_id` (`site_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

--
-- Dumping data for table `groups_have_sites`
--

INSERT INTO `groups_have_sites` (`group_id`, `site_id`) VALUES
(2, 2),
(3, 4),
(6, 6),
(7, 8);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `people_have_devices`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `people_have_devices` (
  `person_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `device_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`person_id`,`device_id`),
  KEY `device_id` (`device_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

--
-- Dumping data for table `people_have_devices`
--

INSERT INTO `people_have_devices` (`person_id`, `device_id`) VALUES
(1, 1),
(2, 2),
(3, 3);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `person`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `person` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=7 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `person`
--

INSERT INTO `person` (`id`) VALUES
(1),
(2),
(3),
(4),
(5),
(6);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `site`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `site` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=9 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `site`
--

INSERT INTO `site` (`id`) VALUES
(1),
(2),
(3),
(4),
(5),
(6),
(7),
(8);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `sites_have_devices`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `sites_have_devices` (
  `site_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `device_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`site_id`,`device_id`),
  KEY `device_id` (`device_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

--
-- Dumping data for table `sites_have_devices`
--

INSERT INTO `sites_have_devices` (`site_id`, `device_id`) VALUES
(3, 4),
(4, 5);

-- --------------------------------------------------------

--
-- Table structure for table `sites_have_people`
--

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `sites_have_people` (
  `site_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `person_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`site_id`,`person_id`),
  KEY `person_id` (`person_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

--
-- Dumping data for table `sites_have_people`
--

INSERT INTO `sites_have_people` (`site_id`, `person_id`) VALUES
(1, 1),
(2, 3),
(5, 4),
(6, 6);

--
-- Constraints for dumped tables
--

--
-- Constraints for table `groups_have_devices`
--
ALTER TABLE `groups_have_devices`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `groups_have_devices_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`device_id`) REFERENCES `device` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `groups_have_devices_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`group_id`) REFERENCES `group` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION;

--
-- Constraints for table `groups_have_people`
--
ALTER TABLE `groups_have_people`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `groups_have_people_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`person_id`) REFERENCES `person` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `groups_have_people_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`group_id`) REFERENCES `group` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION;

--
-- Constraints for table `groups_have_sites`
--
ALTER TABLE `groups_have_sites`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `groups_have_sites_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`site_id`) REFERENCES `site` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `groups_have_sites_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`group_id`) REFERENCES `group` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION;

--
-- Constraints for table `people_have_devices`
--
ALTER TABLE `people_have_devices`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `people_have_devices_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`device_id`) REFERENCES `device` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `people_have_devices_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`person_id`) REFERENCES `person` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION;

--
-- Constraints for table `sites_have_devices`
--
ALTER TABLE `sites_have_devices`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `sites_have_devices_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`device_id`) REFERENCES `device` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `sites_have_devices_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`site_id`) REFERENCES `site` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION;

--
-- Constraints for table `sites_have_people`
--
ALTER TABLE `sites_have_people`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `sites_have_people_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`person_id`) REFERENCES `person` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
  ADD CONSTRAINT `sites_have_people_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`site_id`) REFERENCES `site` (`id`) ON DELETE NO ACTION ON UPDATE NO ACTION;
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1;

/*!40101 SET CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT=@OLD_CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT */;
/*!40101 SET CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS=@OLD_CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS */;
/*!40101 SET COLLATION_CONNECTION=@OLD_COLLATION_CONNECTION */;

Here is a query to find all child devices of every group.

SELECT
  `group`.`id` AS `group_id`,
  `device`.`id` AS `device_id`
FROM
  `group`
  INNER JOIN groups_have_devices
    ON (group.id=groups_have_devices.group_id)
  INNER JOIN device
    ON (groups_have_devices.device_id=device.id)

UNION ALL

SELECT
  `group`.`id` AS `group_id`,
  `device`.`id` AS `device_id`
FROM
  `group`
  INNER JOIN groups_have_people
    ON (group.id=groups_have_people.group_id)
  INNER JOIN person
    ON (groups_have_people.person_id=person.id)
  INNER JOIN people_have_devices
    ON (person.id=people_have_devices.person_id)
  INNER JOIN device
    ON (people_have_devices.device_id=device.id)

UNION ALL

SELECT
  `group`.`id` AS `group_id`,
  `device`.`id` AS `device_id`
FROM
  `group`
  INNER JOIN groups_have_sites
    ON (group.id=groups_have_sites.group_id)
  INNER JOIN site
    ON (groups_have_sites.site_id=site.id)
  INNER JOIN sites_have_devices
    ON (site.id=sites_have_devices.site_id)
  INNER JOIN device
    ON (sites_have_devices.device_id=device.id)

UNION ALL

SELECT
  `group`.`id` AS `group_id`,
  `device`.`id` AS `device_id`
FROM
  `group`
  INNER JOIN groups_have_sites
    ON (group.id=groups_have_sites.group_id)
  INNER JOIN site
    ON (groups_have_sites.site_id=site.id)
  INNER JOIN sites_have_people
    ON (site.id=sites_have_people.site_id)
  INNER JOIN person
    ON (sites_have_people.person_id=person.id)
  INNER JOIN people_have_devices
    ON (person.id=people_have_devices.person_id)
  INNER JOIN device
    ON (people_have_devices.device_id=device.id)
ORDER BY
  group_id

And here is a query to get all devices and their direct parent.

SELECT
  device.id AS device_id,
  person.id AS person_id,
  NULL AS site_id,
  NULL AS group_id
FROM
  device
  INNER JOIN people_have_devices
    ON (device.id=people_have_devices.device_id)
  INNER JOIN person
    ON (people_have_devices.person_id=person.id)

UNION ALL

SELECT
  device.id AS device_id,
  NULL AS person_id,
  site.id AS site_id,
  NULL AS group_id
FROM
  device
  INNER JOIN sites_have_devices
    ON (device.id=sites_have_devices.device_id)
  INNER JOIN site
    ON (sites_have_devices.site_id=site.id)

UNION ALL

SELECT
  device.id AS device_id,
  NULL AS person_id,
  NULL AS site_id,
  group.id AS group_id
FROM
  device
  INNER JOIN groups_have_devices
    ON (device.id=groups_have_devices.device_id)
  INNER JOIN `group`
    ON (groups_have_devices.group_id=group.id)

You can further get the devices that are direct children for a particular person, group, or site like this

SELECT
  device_id
FROM (
  SELECT
    device.id AS device_id,
    NULL AS person_id,
    site.id AS site_id,
    NULL AS group_id
  FROM
    device
    INNER JOIN sites_have_devices
      ON (device.id=sites_have_devices.device_id)
    INNER JOIN site
      ON (sites_have_devices.site_id=site.id)
) sub_query
WHERE
  sub_query.site_id='3'
share|improve this answer
    
I'd be interested in your opinion on my answer. I'll re-accept your answer at the end of the week. stackoverflow.com/a/19153449/129805 –  chrisdew Oct 3 '13 at 7:38

This is a typical type/subtype situation. Your second option is better and you could take it one step further. Think in terms of OO programming if you are more familiar with these concepts.

This is the how I would classify your entities. "Abstract" entities are in brackets.

             (Owner)                 Device
               |
         +-----------+
         |           |
   (Afffiliation)  Person
         |
     +-------+
     |       |
   Group    Site

Heres is how to read it:

  • Types of owners are: a Person, or an Affiliation (I can't find a better name, sorry). A Person "is a" Owner, and an Affiliation "is a" owner.
  • Types of Affiliations are: a Group, or a Site
  • A Person is affiliated with an Affiliation, either a Group or a Site
  • A Device has a Owner, either a Group, or a Site, or a Person

How to translate this into tables:

EER diagram

Now you could stick to your first option. MySQL does not support the CHECK() syntax for declaring arbitrary constraints, but the same effect can be achieved through the use of triggers, However, the syntax is cumbersome, and the performance is dubious.

share|improve this answer

Another way to approach this is to split out some tables into multiple tables, and UNION ALL them back together.

This is slightly more complex, but allows a far greater guarantee of correctness.

(I've unaccepted the answer from @amaster507 for a week, to hopefully get some opinions on this solution.)

Requirements:

group
-----
id

site
----
id
group_id (optional)

person
------
id
group_id (one of these two must exist 
site_id   and the other must be null)

device
------
id 
group_id  (one of these three must exist 
site_id    and the others must be null)
person_id  

Proposed Schema:

group
-----
id

site
----
id
group_id (optional)

person_in_group
---------------
id
group_id  

person_at_site
--------------
id
site_id   

device_in_group
---------------
id 
group_id   

device_at_site
--------------
id 
site_id   

device_with_person
------------------
id 
person_id 

Queries that would have been made on the person table now need to be made against a UNION ALL of the person_in_group and person_at_site tables.

Likewise, queries that would have been made on the device table now need to be made against a UNION ALL of the device_in_group, device_at_site and device_with_person tables.

share|improve this answer
    
P.S. I've found that PostgreSQL's table inheritance might make the problem go away entirely. The only issue is that you cannot add (unique) indexes across (parent and child) tables, but its not a deal-breaker. It even supports using a shared single sequence for autoincrement IDs. –  chrisdew Oct 3 '13 at 7:44
    
I am not familiar with PostgreSQL's table inheritance. This answer however is very very similar to my answer with the differences of not having a separate tables for people, devices, site and pivot tables having different names. I believe that my way would still be more normalized but both could very well work for your needs. If you will be storing other information about people and devices like name, age, model, etc. then having separate tables will help because then you will not have to duplicate data in the database. (cont.) –  amaster507 Oct 3 '13 at 14:28
    
(cont.) If you only care for the id's for people and devices, and if a site can only be in one group, and if devices and people do not often need to change sites and groups then this could very well be better. If any one of these previous three statements is false, then my way would still be better. –  amaster507 Oct 3 '13 at 14:29
    
@amaster507 thanks for your comments, yes I agree that your solution is better in the general case. This solution is specialised for associations being relatively static (i.e. generally months or years). Changing an association does require that a record is deleted and inserted into a different table. I am digging deeper into PostgreSQL, as it's only disadvantage (compared with MySQL) seems to be that I haven't used it much. –  chrisdew Oct 7 '13 at 8:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.