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I'm attempting to create a BitTorrent library in C# as a side project, for fun. However, I've run into a design issue that could create problems later on if I don't address it now.

I currently have a PeerGreeter class, which puts a Socket in a listening state for any peers that try to connect to me, to serve me files in the torrent. When a peer connects, the greeter exchanges handshakes, makes sure everything is valid, and then fires a PeerConnected event with the associated Socket and handshake information as handler arguments.

My Torrent class, which is a representation of a single torrent and all its duties, has two lists of all peers in the swarm (encapsulated in a Peer object), connected and disconnected. When the greeter fires the PeerConnected event, the Torrent instance finds the corresponding Peer in the disconnected list. If it finds one, it moves it to the connected list, and sets a Connection property of type Socket in its instance to the Socket created by the greeter. The property is an auto-property with the access modifiers as: { get; internal set; }

The problem I'm having is that this, as far as I know, isn't thread-safe. If one thread is working with a connection of a Peer, and then another thread modifies that connection object somehow, or disposes it, it could create issues. I've considered setting the Connection property's setter's access modifier to private, and having it set in the constructor, but the problem with that is that I need to create a new object to replace the placeholder Peer in the disconnected list to add it to the connected list.

My question is should I stick with having the setter as internal, or is making it private and replacing the placeholder with an entirely new instance a good approach as well?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

For thread-safety purposes, making the type as immutable as possible will save you many, many headaches. Make the accessor private (or better yet, mark the field as readonly) and generate new instances when changes need to be made.

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