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B j
A i = j

while B is derived from A. my question is this: what c'tors will be called? A's default c'tor and then A's operator= or A's copy c'tor? Thanks!

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closed as too localized by John Dibling, Andrew Barber Jun 7 '13 at 13:44

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6  
Write a 10 line class+program and find out? –  WhozCraig Jun 7 '13 at 12:42
1  
No constructors will be called because it won't compile. Beyond that use @WhozCraig suggestion –  icepack Jun 7 '13 at 12:45
    
why wont it compile? –  tomer.z Jun 7 '13 at 12:47
    
Try and find out! –  LukaCiko Jun 7 '13 at 12:49
    
Voted to close. –  John Dibling Jun 7 '13 at 13:24

2 Answers 2

A copy constructor, since is a initialization, not an assignment.

From standard C++98 12.8 [class.copy] p1:

A class object can be copied in two ways, by initialization (12.1, 8.5), including for function argument passing (5.2.2) and for function value return (6.6.3), and by assignment (5.17). Conceptually, these two operations are implemented by a copy constructor (12.1) and copy assignment operator (13.5.3).

The redaction looks a bit ambiguous here. May be better the redaction of C++11 (take care of semicolon):

A class object can be copied or moved in two ways: by initialization (12.1, 8.5), including for function argument passing (5.2.2) and for function value return (6.6.3); and by assignment (5.17). Conceptually, these two operations are implemented by a copy/move constructor (12.1) and copy/move assignment operator (13.5.3).

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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{

public:

    A()
    {
        cout << "(A) default constructor"<< endl;
    }

    A(const A& a)
    {
        cout << "(A) copy constructor" << endl;
    }

    A& operator=(const A& a)
    {
        cout << "(A) operator=" << endl;
    }

};

class B : public A
{

public:

    B()
    {
        cout << "(B) default constructor" << endl;
    }


};

int main()
{

    A a1;
    A a2 = a1;
    A a3(a1);

    cout<<"*******"<<endl;

    B b1;

    cout<<"*******"<<endl;

    B b4;
    A a4 = b4;

    return 0;
}

--output:--
(A) default constructor
(A) copy constructor
(A) copy constructor
*******
(A) default constructor
(B) default constructor
*******
(A) default constructor
(B) default constructor
(A) copy constructor
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