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I want to write c++ program that will put selected files from my lan into zip. But my problem is that i dont know how to limit speed of that process. Do you have any idea how to do that?

Sorry for my bad english :P .

Edit

Lets imagine lan with ~16 PCs and u want to "backup" 5 GB from each to server. And while this "backup" takes time u want to check something in web. Impossible because netwotk packed up.

What I want to accomplish is lowering load on lan by specifying speed in bytes. It doesnt even matter if it wont be exact, but precise has to be about 10-15%.

"You don't want to limit zipping speed, but lower bandwidth usage. – bartimar" Ure right.

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2  
are you sure you should be doing that?! – Bathsheba Jun 7 '13 at 13:14
3  
Limit the speed of the zip operation? Or limit the speed at which files are transferred over the network? In either case, why? – acron Jun 7 '13 at 13:14
2  
Unusual; most people ask how to make their code run faster, not slower. – Pete Becker Jun 7 '13 at 18:04
    
You don't want to limit zipping speed, but lower bandwidth usage. – bartimar Jun 7 '13 at 21:11

The system will always try to execute orders as fast as possible. If you want to really slow down a process, you can make it

sleep()

It does not really make sense though to slow down your application. Are you maybe waiting for your data IO instead? In that case, use some sort of callback to compress data whenever enough is available.

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If you're worried about negatively impacting overall system performance, set the priority of the thread or process to below normal or perhaps even idle priority.

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