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I did this in a previous adventure using this code:

def lobby():
invalid_check == True
while invalid_check == True: #This "while" loops exists solely to loop the command sequence should the user enter a bogus command.
    action = raw_input("> ")
    if "use" and "door" in action:
        print "You feel a sense of anxiousness as your hand lingers over the door knob, but your curiosity sets in -- you open the door and step through."
        invalid_check == False # It is now 'False' and will therefore allow the user to progress to the next 'room' or function.
        toy_room()
    elif "use" and "lever" in action:
        print "test"
    elif "examine" in action:
        print "Pretty simple here -- just a blue door and a red lever."
    elif "inventory" in action:
        inv()
    else:
        invalid()
        invalid_check == True

I made a while loop to prompt the user as long as this was True and whenever I wanted to stop the input prompt action (say, after death or upon moving to a new room) I would set this to False.

My friend edited my code for me and said that this was redundant -- I was wondering what would be a more efficient way to keep my input coming up in every room (each room being its own Class) after a user has input an action?

Example:

input > examine door

"Blah blah door"

input > *<----- prompt shows up again *

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It is impossible to answer if there is a more efficient way if you are not showing what you currently do :) –  Krumelur Jun 7 '13 at 13:57
    
Ah, sorry. I added a more in-depth snippet. –  JoshieSimmons Jun 7 '13 at 14:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you confuse assignment (=) with comparison (==). The correct code would look something like:

def lobby():
    invalid_check = True
    while invalid_check:
        action = raw_input("> ")
        if "use" and "door" in action:
            print "You feel a sense of anxiousness as your hand lingers over the door knob, but your curiosity sets in -- you open the door and step through."
            invalid_check = False # It is now 'False' and will therefore allow the user to progress to the next 'room' or function.
            toy_room()
     ......
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Ah, I see! Thanks! –  JoshieSimmons Jun 7 '13 at 14:12

Are you thinking something like this:

while playing {
    if input is not None: 
        # Examine input
        if input == "exit":
            playing = False

    # Wait for user to input
    input = raw_input('input > ')
}
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