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I am working on some legacy VB6 code and I am having my program break with this message:

enter image description here

and it then highlights this code:

enter image description here

I know that the specified locations exist per these screenshots:

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I am running this Visual Studio 6.0 on a 64-bit Windows 7 machine. How can I make the program see shell?

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Are you sure FileServer & "\public\Drafting" exists? –  Bathsheba Jun 7 '13 at 14:07
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You do know that command.com is very legacy and old? You should use %comspec% or cmd.exe or the required command directly if it's an executable. –  Deanna Jun 7 '13 at 22:49
    
In addition to the already posted answers you may also need to be running your process elevated in order to achieve what you want –  Matt Wilko Jul 24 '13 at 14:17
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The vb command is not correct for the OS that you are running. You need to check that that drive is not already mapped, and remove the command.com /c from the command that you are trying to execute.

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command.com does not exist on 64 bit windows.

Try using C:\Windows\SysWOW64\cmd.exe instead. C:\Windows\SysWOW64 is a folder giving you backwards compatibility stuff for 32 bit.

But see the comment below (taken from Euro Micelli).

Really you should use %SYSTEMROOT\System32\cmd.exe instead. First, Windows is not always installed in C:\Windows; you should let the system figure that out. Second, using System32 is always correct for a 32-bit application: when running on Win32, it is the correct folder; when running on Win64, Windows will map %SYSTEMROOT%\System32 to %SYSTEMROOT%\SysWOW64

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Actually, you should use %SYSTEMROOT\System32\cmd.exe instead. First, Windows is not always installed in C:\Windows; you should let the system figure that out. Second, using System32 is always correct for a 32-bit application: when running on Win32, it is the correct folder; when running on Win64, Windows will map %SYSTEMROOT%\System32 to %SYSTEMROOT%\SysWOW64 for you. –  Euro Micelli Jun 7 '13 at 15:32
    
Indeed Euro Micelli, I'll amend the answer. Sorry, was being a little lazy; Friday after all. –  Bathsheba Jun 7 '13 at 15:35
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I use vb6 and windows 7.

I've done the same thing as you but I put the dos command in a bat file.

Login.bat

NET USE W: \\10.48.10.8\e$

Then in the code Shell ("c:\login.bat")

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Note that there is a VERY big difference between DOS and the command line interface to Windows! –  Deanna Jun 7 '13 at 23:10
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