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I have requirement where i have to get data of particular day. So my ideal startdate should be 2013-06-07 00:00:01 AM and end date 2013-06-07 23:59:59 AM

Hence i have written this code.

create or replace
PROCEDURE checkChanges

IS

vc_startDate timestamp;
vc_endDate timestamp;
begin 

    vc_startDate :=to_timestamp(TO_CHAR(trunc(systimestamp)-40+((24*60*60)-1)/(24*60*60),'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss'),'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss'); 
    vc_endDate :=to_timestamp(TO_CHAR(trunc(systimestamp)+1/(24*60*60),'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss'),'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss');

    Dbms_Output.Put_Line('vc_startDate ' ||vc_startDate);
    Dbms_Output.Put_Line('vc_endDate ' ||vc_endDate);

    SELECT EMAIL_ADRESS FROM SOMETABLE A,B
    AND A.CREATE_TS BETWEEN vc_startDate AND vc_endDate ORDER BY B.START_DT;

end checkChanges;

But the start date and end date i am getting is quite different.

start date:07-JUN-13 12.00.01.000000 AM

end date: 07-JUN-13 11.59.59.000000 PM

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1 Answer 1

Here's a simple way to do this.

DECLARE
   v_start   TIMESTAMP;
   v_end     TIMESTAMP;
BEGIN
   v_start := TRUNC (SYSTIMESTAMP) + NUMTODSINTERVAL (1, 'second'); --truncate the timestamp and add one second
   DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE (TO_CHAR (v_start, 'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss'));

/*alternate way
v_start := TRUNC (SYSTIMESTAMP) + INTERVAL '0 0:0:1' DAY TO SECOND; --truncate the timestamp and add one second
DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE (TO_CHAR (v_start, 'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss AM'));*/

   v_end :=
        TRUNC (SYSTIMESTAMP)                         --trunacate the timestamp
      + INTERVAL '1 0:0:0.0' DAY TO SECOND                         --add a day
      - NUMTODSINTERVAL (1, 'second');                    --substract a second
   DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE (TO_CHAR (v_end, 'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss'));

/*alternate way
v_end := TRUNC (SYSTIMESTAMP)                     --trunacate the timestamp
                             + INTERVAL '0 23:59:59' DAY TO SECOND; --add hours, mins, s
DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE (TO_CHAR (v_end, 'yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi:ss AM'));*/
EXCEPTION
   WHEN OTHERS
   THEN
      DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE (SQLERRM);
END;

Output:

2013-06-07 00:00:01 AM
2013-06-07 23:59:59 PM

UPDATE

I also printed the values without converting to to_char and it displayed similar to what u got.

DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE (v_start);
DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE (v_end);

Output:

07-JUN-13 12.00.01.000000 AM
07-JUN-13 11.59.59.000000 PM

So, it seems what you are doing is correct(but, little complicated). When displaying the timestamp it is getting displayed according to the NLS parameters. Check that using

SELECT *
  FROM nls_session_parameters
 WHERE parameter = 'NLS_TIMESTAMP_FORMAT';

I guess it will return this DD-MON-RR HH.MI.SSXFF AM

Do not worry about how it is being displayed. A date/timestamp variable has no format. It matters only when you want to print it. If don't use to_char function, it'll take the format mask as defined in NLS parameters. If you want to override it, use to_char function and specify the mask.But when used in the query, it'll have the correct value.

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